The wider implications of the COVID-19 pandemic: assessing the impact of accident and emergency use for frequent attenders

Kyle, D., Shaw, M., Maguire, D., McMillan, D. , Quasim, T. , Leyland, A. H. and McPeake, J. (2021) The wider implications of the COVID-19 pandemic: assessing the impact of accident and emergency use for frequent attenders. International Emergency Nursing, 56, 100984. (doi: 10.1016/j.ienj.2021.100984) (PMID:33677141) (PMCID:PMC7896822)

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Abstract

Introduction: Emergency departments have seen altered patterns of attendance since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, with reductions in the number of attendances for non-COVID-19 – patients. We assessed the use of the emergency department by frequent attenders during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic and explored any changes in emergency department attendance by this group. Methods: As part of ongoing improvement work, we utilised a cohort design to evaluate the difference in patterns of attendance for the frequent attender group in a single centre. We created a 2019 ‘top attender’ cohort and a similar cohort for 2020. We compared admission patterns between the two time periods in order to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on this group. Results: Both groups were predominately male. Mental health and substance misuse use problems were common across both cohorts. The majority of patients lived in a socio-economically deprived areas. The median number emergency department visits in 2019, for the top attender cohort was 6 (IQR: 4-9) vs 4 (IQR: 2-7) for the top attender cohort of 2020 (p<.0013). Conclusion: This single centre evaluation has shown a significant reduction in emergency department attendances for a frequent attender cohort in a single centre. Future work should investigate the longer-term impact which the COVID-19 pandemic has had on this patient group.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was funded by the Scottish Government’s Value Improvement Fund. AHL is part of the Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, funded by the Medical Research Council (MC_UU_12017/13) and the Scottish Government Chief Scientist Office (SPHSU13). JM is funded by a THIS Institute, University of Cambridge Research Fellowship (PD-2019-02-16).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Quasim, Professor Tara and Kyle, David and McMillan, Professor Donald and McPeake, Dr Jo and Shaw, Dr Martin and Maguire, Donogh and Leyland, Professor Alastair
Authors: Kyle, D., Shaw, M., Maguire, D., McMillan, D., Quasim, T., Leyland, A. H., and McPeake, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care
Journal Name:International Emergency Nursing
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1755-599X
ISSN (Online):1878-013X
Published Online:20 February 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 The Authors
First Published:First published in International Emergency Nursing 56: 100984
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
727651SPHSU Core Renewal: Measuring and Analysing Socioeconomic Inequalities in Health Research ProgrammeAlastair LeylandMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/13IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
Chief Scientist Office (CSO)SPHSU13
Inequalities in healthMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_00022/2HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit
307748Improving health and social care integration delivery in the acute care environmentJoanne McPeakeUniversity of Cambridge (HEI-CAMB)RG88620HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit