Coenzyme Q redox signalling and longevity

Scialo, F. and Sanz, A. (2021) Coenzyme Q redox signalling and longevity. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 164, pp. 187-205. (doi: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2021.01.018) (PMID:33450379)

[img] Text
232377.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

1MB

Abstract

Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell. They produce a significant amount of the energy we need to grow, survive and reproduce. The same system that generates energy in the form of ATP also produces Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (mtROS) were considered for many years toxic by-products of metabolism, responsible for ageing and many degenerative diseases. Today, we know that mtROS are essential redox messengers required to determine cell fate and maintain cellular homeostasis. Most mtROS are produced by respiratory complex I (CI) and complex III (CIII). How and when CI and CIII produce ROS is determined by the redox state of the Coenzyme Q (CoQ) pool and the proton motive force (pmf) generated during respiration. During ageing, there is an accumulation of defective mitochondria that generate high levels of mtROS. This causes oxidative stress and disrupts redox signalling. Here, we review how mtROS are generated in young and old mitochondria and how CI and CIII derived ROS control physiological and pathological processes. Finally, we discuss why damaged mitochondria amass during ageing as well as methods to preserve mitochondrial redox signalling with age.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Sanz Montero, Professor Alberto
Authors: Scialo, F., and Sanz, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
Journal Name:Free Radical Biology and Medicine
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0891-5849
ISSN (Online):1873-4596
Published Online:12 January 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2021 Elsevier Inc.
First Published:First published in Free Radical Biology and Medicine 164: 187-205
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record