British Universities and transatlantic slavery: the University of Glasgow case

Mullen, S. (2021) British Universities and transatlantic slavery: the University of Glasgow case. History Workshop Journal, 91(1), pp. 210-233. (doi: 10.1093/hwj/dbaa035)

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Abstract

On 16 September 2018, the University of Glasgow released the report ‘Slavery, Abolition and the University of Glasgow’. This acknowledged that slave-owners, merchants and planters with connections to New World slavery – and their descendants – donated capital between 1697 and 1937 that influenced the development of the institution. In producing this report, the institution became the first British university to declare historical income derived from transatlantic slavery. In response, a nine-point programme reported as reparative justice was launched, the first British university to launch a project on such a scale. This article traces both the methodological approach undertaken in the study and the historical evidence related to the University of Glasgow. This provides insights into the process of collecting and analysing the evidence on which the report and strategy was based. Current understandings about British universities and transatlantic slavery are shaped by the institutional relationship with owners of enslaved people. This article underlines the importance of merchant capital – in this case, mainly via West India commerce – to the development of one institution.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Mullen, Dr Stephen
Authors: Mullen, S.
Subjects:D History General and Old World > D History (General)
D History General and Old World > DA Great Britain
College/School:College of Arts > School of Humanities > History
Research Group:History
Journal Name:History Workshop Journal
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1363-3554
ISSN (Online):1477-4569
Published Online:03 July 2021
Copyright Holders:Copyright © The Author(s) 2021
First Published:First published in History Workshop Journal 91(1): 210-233
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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