Evaluation of healthcare workers' and students' knowledge levels about infections transmitted by blood and body fluids, infection control measures, exposure frequencies and serological and hepatitis B vaccination status = Saǧlik Çalışanları ve öǧrencilerin kan ve vücut sıvılarıyla bulşan enfeksiyonlar, enfeksiyon kontrol önlemleri hakkındaki bilgi düzeyleri, temas sıklıkları, serolojik durumları ve hepatit B aşilanma durumlarnin degerlendirilmesi

Çelik, Y., Akduman, D. and Kiran, S. (2010) Evaluation of healthcare workers' and students' knowledge levels about infections transmitted by blood and body fluids, infection control measures, exposure frequencies and serological and hepatitis B vaccination status = Saǧlik Çalışanları ve öǧrencilerin kan ve vücut sıvılarıyla bulşan enfeksiyonlar, enfeksiyon kontrol önlemleri hakkındaki bilgi düzeyleri, temas sıklıkları, serolojik durumları ve hepatit B aşilanma durumlarnin degerlendirilmesi. Turkiye Klinikleri Journal of Medical Sciences, 30(4), pp. 1246-1255. (doi: 10.5336/medsci.2009-13735)

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Abstract

Objective: Evaluation of healthcare workers', medical and nursing students' knowledge levels about infections transmitted by blood and body fluids, infection control measures, exposure frequencies and serological and hepatitis B vaccination status. Material and Methods: The study was cross-sectional and conducted in Karaelmas University Teaching and Research Hospital Zonguldak, Turkey. Data were collected by questionnaires. The study included 445 subjects (131 medical students [MS], 34 nursing students [NS], 280 healthcare workers). Results: Mean age was 25.5+5.4. Mean knowledge level scores (MKLS) increased with age and education level (p=0.001). Doctors had highest MKLS. MKLS of medical students working in clinics was higher than NS (p=0.001) and NS had higher MKLS than preclinical MS (p=0.001). Subjects who received in-service training on bloodborne infections and infection control precautions had higher MKLS than persons who did not (p=0.001). Blood and body fluid exposure frequency was 54%. Exposed subjects had higher MKLS than unexposed ones (p=0.001). Exposure frequency was higher in subjects who wanted to get training on bloodborne infections and infection control measures than subjects who did not (Chi square: 14.92 p=0.0001). Needle-stick injury was declared to be the most common exposure cause. Post-exposure reporting rate to the infectious diseases clinic was 27.3% and mean postexposure follow up duration was 2.9+2.3 months. The highest exposure rate was detected in the emergency department (76.3%), and the lowest rate was detected in dialysis unit (37.1%). Hepatitis B vaccination rate was 71.9%. The most frequent reason for nonvaccination was not having time. Anti HCV positivity was detected in 1.2% and inactive HBsAg carrier state was detected in 1.5% of healthcare workers. Conclusion: Exposure to blood and body secretions can be reduced by educating healthcare workers, increasing adherence to infection control measures, administrative support, and reporting exposures. Knowledge levels of workers should be tested to evaluate current policies. Seronegative workers should get hepatitis B vaccination.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Kiran, Professor Sibel
Authors: Çelik, Y., Akduman, D., and Kiran, S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:Turkiye Klinikleri Journal of Medical Sciences
Publisher:Turkiye Klinikleri
ISSN:1300-0292

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