Skeletal muscle and metabolic health – how do we increase muscle mass and function in people with type 2 diabetes

Al Ozairi, E. et al. (2020) Skeletal muscle and metabolic health – how do we increase muscle mass and function in people with type 2 diabetes. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, (doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgaa835) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Background: Whilst skeletal muscles’ primary role is in allowing movement it has important metabolic roles, including in glycaemic control. Indeed, evidence indicates that low muscle mass and function are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, highlighting its’ importance in the development of metabolic disease. Methods: In this mini-review, we detail the evidence highlighting the importance of muscle in type 2 diabetes, the efficacy of resistance exercise in improving glycaemic control alongside our approach to increase uptake of such exercise in people with type 2 diabetes. This summary is based in the authors’ knowledge of the filed supplemented by a Pubmed search using the terms “muscle”, “glycaemic control”, “HbA1c”, “type 2 diabetes” and “resistance exercise”. Results: The main strategy to increases muscle mass is to perform resistance exercise and, although the quality of evidence is low, such exercise appears effective in reducing HbA1c in people with type 2 diabetes. However, to increase participation we need to improve our understanding of barriers and facilitators to such exercise. Current data indicate that barriers are similar to those reported for aerobic exercise, with additional resistance exercise specific barriers of looking to muscular, increase risk of cardiovascular event, having access to specialised equipment and knowledge of how to use it. Conclusions: The development of simple resistance exercises that can be performed anywhere, that use little or no equipment and are effective in reducing HbA1c will be, in our opinion, key to increasing the number of people with type 2 diabetes performing resistance exercise.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gray, Professor Cindy and Celis, Dr Carlos and Gray, Dr Stuart and Gill, Professor Jason and Welsh, Dr Paul and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Boonpor, Jirapitcha
Authors: Al Ozairi, E., Alroudhan, D., Alsaeed, D., Voase, N., Hasan, A., Gill, J. M.R., Sattar, N., Welsh, P., Gray, C. M., Boonpor, J., Celis-Morales, C., and Gray, S. R.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Social Scientists working in Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0021-972X
ISSN (Online):1945-7197
Published Online:12 November 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © The Author(s) 2020
First Published:First published in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 2020
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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