Simulating the density reduction and equity impact of potential tobacco retail control policies

Caryl, F. M. , Pearce, J., Reid, G., Mitchell, R. and Shortt, N. K. (2020) Simulating the density reduction and equity impact of potential tobacco retail control policies. Tobacco Control, (doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2020-056002) (PMID:33148694) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Background: Reducing the provision of tobacco is important for decreasing inequalities in smoking and smoking-related harm. Various policies have been proposed to achieve this, but their impacts—particularly on equity—are often unknown. Here, using national-level data, we simulate the impacts of potential policies designed to reduce tobacco outlet density (TOD). Methods: Tobacco retailer locations (n=9030) were geocoded from Scotland’s national register, forming a baseline. Twelve policies were developed in three types: (1) regulating type of retailer selling tobacco, (2) regulating location of tobacco sales, and (3) area-based TOD caps. Density reduction was measured as mean percentage reduction in TOD across data zones and number of retailers nationally. Equity impact was measured using regression-based Relative Index of Inequality (RII) across income deprivation quintiles. Results: Policies restricting tobacco sales to a single outlet type (‘Supermarket’; ‘Liquor store’; ‘Pharmacy’) caused >80% TOD reduction and >90% reduction in the number of tobacco outlets nationally. However, RIIs indicated that two of these policies (‘Liquor store’, ‘Pharmacy’) increased socioeconomic inequalities in TOD. Equity-promoting policies included ‘Minimum spacing’ and exclusion zones around ‘Child spaces’. The only policy to remove statistically significant TOD inequalities was the one deliberately targeted to do so (‘Reduce clusters’). Conclusions: Using spatial simulations, we show that all selected policies reduced provision of tobacco retailing to varying degrees. However, the most ‘successful’ at doing so also increased inequalities. Consequently, policy-makers should consider how the methods by which tobacco retail density is reduced, and success measured, align with policy aims.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This research was funded by Cancer Research UK. FMC and RM are supported by the Medical Research Council (MC_UU_12017/10) and the Chief Scientist Office (SPHSU10). FMC is supported by an MRC Skills Development Fellowship. JP and NKS are members of SPECTRUM a UK Prevention Research Partnership Consortium. UKPRP is an initiative funded by the UK Research and Innovation Councils, the Department of Health and Social Care (England) and the UK devolved administrations, and leading health research charities.
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Caryl, Dr Fiona
Authors: Caryl, F. M., Pearce, J., Reid, G., Mitchell, R., and Shortt, N. K.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Tobacco Control
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0964-4563
ISSN (Online):1468-3318
Published Online:04 November 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 The Authors
First Published:First published in Tobacco Control 2020
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
727621SPHSU Core Renewal: Neighbourhoods and Communities Research ProgrammeAnne EllawayMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/10IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
Chief Scientist Office (CSO)SPHSU10