An economic evaluation of contingency management for completion of hepatitis B vaccination in those on treatment for opiate dependence

Rafia, R. et al. (2016) An economic evaluation of contingency management for completion of hepatitis B vaccination in those on treatment for opiate dependence. Addiction, 111(9), pp. 1616-1627. (doi: 10.1111/add.13385) (PMID:26990598) (PMCID:PMC5347913)

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Abstract

Aims: To determine whether the provision of contingency management using financial incentives to improve hepatitis B vaccine completion in people who inject drugs entering community treatment represents a cost‐effective use of health‐care resources. Design: A probabilistic cost‐effectiveness analysis was conducted, using a decision‐tree to estimate the short‐term clinical and health‐care cost impact of the vaccination strategies, followed by a Markov process to evaluate the long‐term clinical consequences and costs associated with hepatitis B infection. Settings and participants: Data on attendance to vaccination from a UK cluster randomized trial. Intervention: Two contingency management options were examined in the trial: fixed versus escalating schedule financial incentives. Measurement: Life‐time health‐care costs and quality‐adjusted life years discounted at 3.5% annually; incremental cost‐effectiveness ratios. Findings: The resulting estimate for the incremental life‐time health‐care cost of the contingency management strategy versus usual care was £21.86 [95% confidence interval (CI) = –£12.20 to 39.86] per person offered the incentive. For 1000 people offered the incentive, the incremental reduction in numbers of hepatitis B infections avoided over their lifetime was estimated at 19 (95% CI = 8–30). The probabilistic incremental cost per quality adjusted life‐year gained of the contingency management programme was estimated to be £6738 (95% CI = £6297–7172), with an 89% probability of being considered cost‐effective at a threshold of £20 000 per quality‐adjusted life years gained (97.60% at £30 000). Conclusions: Using financial incentives to increase hepatitis B vaccination completion in people who inject drugs could be a cost‐effective use of health‐care resources in the UK as long as the incidence remains above 1.2%.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This paper presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under its Programme Grants for Applied Research Programme (Grant Reference no. RP‐PG‐0707‐10 149).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Meier, Professor Petra
Authors: Rafia, R., Dodd, P. J., Brennan, A., Meier, P. S., Hope, V. D., Ncube, F., Byford, S., Tie, H., Metrebian, N., Hellier, J., Weaver, T., and Strang, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Addiction
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0965-2140
ISSN (Online):1360-0443
Published Online:06 May 2016
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Authors
First Published:First published in Addiction 111(9): 1616-1627
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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