Contextual characteristics of adults’ drinking occasions and their association with levels of alcohol consumption and acute alcohol‐related harm: a mapping review

Stevely, A. K., Holmes, J. and Meier, P. S. (2020) Contextual characteristics of adults’ drinking occasions and their association with levels of alcohol consumption and acute alcohol‐related harm: a mapping review. Addiction, 115(2), pp. 218-229. (doi: 10.1111/add.14839) (PMID:31655026)

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Abstract

Background and Aims: There is a growing literature using event‐level methods to estimate associations between contextual characteristics of drinking occasions, consumption levels and acute harms. This literature spans many research traditions and has not been brought together as a whole. This mapping review aimed to identify and describe the theoretical approaches to conceptualizing drinking occasions, study designs, predictors and outcome measures used in existing research with a view to identifying dominant approaches, research gaps and areas for further synthesis. Methods: Eligible papers studied adults’ drinking occasions using quantitative event‐level methods and considered one or more contextual characteristics (e.g. venue, timing or company) and at least one event‐level consumption or acute alcohol‐related harm outcome. We systematically searched Ovid MEDLINE, PsycInfo and the Web of Science Social Sciences Citation Index, extracting data on studies’ theoretical approach, data collection methods, settings, populations, drinking occasion characteristics and outcome measures. Results: Searches identified 278 eligible papers (from 1975 to 2019), predominantly published after 2010 (n = 181; 65.1%). Most papers reported research conducted in the United States (n = 170; 61.2%) and half used student participants (n = 133; 47.8%). Papers typically lacked a stated theoretical approach (n = 203; 73.0%). Consistent with this, only 53 (19.1%) papers studied three or more occasion characteristics and most used methods that assume occasion characteristics do not change during an occasion (n = 189; 68.0%). The most common outcome type considered was consumption (n = 224; 80.6%) and only a few papers studied specific acute harm outcomes such as unprotected sex (n = 24; 8.6%), drink driving (n = 14; 5.0%) or sexual violence (n = 9; 3.2%). Conclusions: Studies from 1975 to 2019 using event‐level methods to estimate associations between contextual characteristics of drinking occasions, consumption levels and acute harms were largely focused on students and consumption outcomes, and most have considered a limited range of contextual characteristics.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Meier, Professor Petra
Authors: Stevely, A. K., Holmes, J., and Meier, P. S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Addiction
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0965-2140
ISSN (Online):1360-0443
Published Online:26 October 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 Society for the Study of Addiction
First Published:First published in Addiction 115(2): 218-229
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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