Peste des petits ruminants virus transmission scaling and husbandry practices that contribute to increased transmission risk: an investigation among sheep, goats, and cattle in Northern Tanzania

Herzog, C. M., de Glanville, W. A., Willett, B. J. , Cattadori, I. M., Kapur, V., Hudson, P. J., Buza, J., Swai, E. S., Cleaveland, S. and Bjørnstad, O. N. (2020) Peste des petits ruminants virus transmission scaling and husbandry practices that contribute to increased transmission risk: an investigation among sheep, goats, and cattle in Northern Tanzania. Viruses, 12(9), 930. (doi: 10.3390/v12090930) (PMID:32847058) (PMCID:PMC7552010)

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Abstract

Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) causes an infectious disease of high morbidity and mortality among sheep and goats which impacts millions of livestock keepers globally. PPRV transmission risk varies by production system, but a deeper understanding of how transmission scales in these systems and which husbandry practices impact risk is needed. To investigate transmission scaling and husbandry practice-associated risk, this study combined 395 household questionnaires with over 7115 cross-sectional serosurvey samples collected in Tanzania among agropastoral and pastoral households managing sheep, goats, or cattle (most managed all three, n = 284, 71.9%). Although self-reported compound-level herd size was significantly larger in pastoral than agropastoral households, the data show no evidence that household herd force of infection (FOI, per capita infection rate of susceptible hosts) increased with herd size. Seroprevalence and FOI patterns observed at the sub-village level showed significant spatial variation in FOI. Univariate analyses showed that household herd FOI was significantly higher when households reported seasonal grazing camp attendance, cattle or goat introduction to the compound, death, sale, or giving away of animals in the past 12 months, when cattle were grazed separately from sheep and goats, and when the household also managed dogs or donkeys. Multivariable analyses revealed that species, production system type, and goat or sheep introduction or seasonal grazing camp attendance, cattle or goat death or sales, or goats given away in the past 12 months significantly increased odds of seroconversion, whereas managing pigs or cattle attending seasonal grazing camps had significantly lower odds of seroconversion. Further research should investigate specific husbandry practices across production systems in other countries and in systems that include additional atypical host species to broaden understanding of PPRV transmission.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Cattadori, Dr Isabella and Willett, Professor Brian and De Glanville, Dr William and Cleaveland, Professor Sarah
Creator Roles:
de Glanville, W. A.Data curation, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Project administration, Resources, Writing – review and editing
Willett, B. J.Data curation, Investigation, Methodology, Project administration, Resources, Supervision, Writing – review and editing
Cleaveland, S.Data curation, Funding acquisition, Project administration, Resources, Writing – review and editing
Cattadori, I. M.Funding acquisition, Writing – review and editing
Authors: Herzog, C. M., de Glanville, W. A., Willett, B. J., Cattadori, I. M., Kapur, V., Hudson, P. J., Buza, J., Swai, E. S., Cleaveland, S., and Bjørnstad, O. N.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Viruses
Publisher:MDPI
ISSN:1999-4915
ISSN (Online):1999-4915
Published Online:24 August 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 The Authors
First Published:First published in Viruses 12(9): 930
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
190825Social, economic and environmental drivers of zoonoses in Tanzania (SEEDZ)Sarah CleavelandBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)BB/L018926/1Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine