After the post-public sphere

Schlesinger, P. (2020) After the post-public sphere. Media, Culture and Society, 42(7-8), pp. 1545-1563. (doi: 10.1177/0163443720948003)

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Abstract

The idea of a public sphere has long been central to discussion of political communication. Its present condition is the topic of this essay. Debate about the public sphere has been shaped by the boundary-policing of competing political systems and ideologies. Current discussion reflects the accelerating transition from the mass media era to the ramifying entrenchment of the Internet age. It has also been influenced by the vogue for analysing populism. The present transitional phase, whose outcome remains unclear, is best described as an unstable ‘post-public sphere’. This instability is not unusual as, over time, conceptions of the public sphere’s underpinnings and scope have continually shifted. Latterly, states’ responses to the development of the Internet have given rise to a new shift of focus, a ‘regulatory turn’. This is likely to influence the future shape of the public sphere.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Schlesinger, Professor Philip
Authors: Schlesinger, P.
College/School:College of Arts > School of Culture and Creative Arts > Theatre Film and TV Studies
Journal Name:Media, Culture and Society
Publisher:SAGE Publications
ISSN:0163-4437
ISSN (Online):1460-3675
Published Online:17 August 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 The Author
First Published:First published in Media, Culture and Society 42(7-8):1545-1563
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy
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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
303123Centre of Excellence for Policy and Evidence in the Creative Industries (PEC)Martin KretschmerArts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)AH/S001298/1CREATe