Genetically modified porcine split-thickness skin grafts as an alternative to allograft for provision of temporary wound coverage: preliminary characterization

Barone, A. A. L., Mastroianni, M., Farkash, E. A., Mallard, C., Albritton, A., Torabi, R., Leonard, D. A. , Kurtz, J. M., Sachs, D. H. and Cetrulo Jr., C. L. (2015) Genetically modified porcine split-thickness skin grafts as an alternative to allograft for provision of temporary wound coverage: preliminary characterization. Burns, 41(3), pp. 565-574. (doi: 10.1016/j.burns.2014.09.003) (PMID:25406888)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Temporary coverage of severely burned patients with cadaver allograft skin represents an important component of burn care, but is limited by availability and cost. Porcine skin shares many physical properties with human skin, but is susceptible to hyperacute rejection due to preformed antibodies to α-1,3-galactose (Gal), a carbohydrate on all porcine cells. Our preliminary studies have suggested that skin grafts from α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knock out (GalT-KO) miniature swine might provide temporary wound coverage comparable to allografts, since GalT-KO swine lack this carbohydrate. To further evaluate this possibility, eight non-human primates received primary autologous, allogeneic, GalT-KO, and GalT + xenogeneic skin grafts. Additionally, secondary grafts were placed to assess whether sensitization would affect the rejection time course of identical-type grafts. We demonstrate that both GalT-KO xenografts and allografts provide temporary coverage of partial- and full-thickness wounds for up to 11 days. In contrast, GalT + xenografts displayed hyperacute rejection, with no signs of vascularization and rapid avulsion from wounds. Furthermore, secondary GalT-KO transplants failed to vascularize, demonstrating that primary graft rejection sensitizes the recipient. We conclude that GalT-KO xenografts may provide temporary coverage of wounds for a duration equivalent to allografts, and thus, could serve as a readily available alternative treatment of severe burns.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Leonard, Dr David
Authors: Barone, A. A. L., Mastroianni, M., Farkash, E. A., Mallard, C., Albritton, A., Torabi, R., Leonard, D. A., Kurtz, J. M., Sachs, D. H., and Cetrulo Jr., C. L.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
Journal Name:Burns
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0305-4179
ISSN (Online):1879-1409
Published Online:16 October 2014

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record