Cultural interventions through children’s literature and arts-based practices in times of disaster: a case study of reading mediators’ response to the Mexican earthquakes (September 2017)

Hirsu, L. , Arizpe, E. and McAdam, J. (2020) Cultural interventions through children’s literature and arts-based practices in times of disaster: a case study of reading mediators’ response to the Mexican earthquakes (September 2017). International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 51, 101797. (doi: 10.1016/j.ijdrr.2020.101797) (PMID:32834977) (PMCID:PMC7425675)

[img]
Preview
Text
221900.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

2MB
[img]
Preview
Text
221900Suppl1.pdf - Supplemental Material

129kB
[img]
Preview
Text
221900Suppl2.pdf - Supplemental Material

369kB

Abstract

Recent natural disasters have challenged current models of crisis management and intervention, demanding speedy, flexible and emergent social actors to respond at multiple levels. To provide a comprehensive response, top-down models have incorporated the critical role played by citizen-volunteers in assisting communities in distress. However, few post-crisis response models have identified new social actors who can contribute with creative, coordinated, and sustainable solutions. In this article, we present the case study of the 2017 Mexican earthquakes and the post-disaster activities developed by an emergent group of social actors — reading mediators. We argue for the critical role of mediators and their use of children’s literature and arts-based practices as essential instruments for community reconstruction. Drawing upon a case study methodology, we share the mediators’ post-disaster activities and experiences in four stages: immediate recovery, stabilisation, development and consolidation. We argue that such cultural interventions are essential in assisting communities recover and build resilience and, more importantly, new social actors such as reading mediators need further formal and institutional support. In this sense, el Protocolo, the cultural protocol developed in response to the mediators’ work, stands as an exemplary model that complements the emergent and distributed actions of reading mediators. As a whole, the Mexican cultural response provides a unique comprehensive approach that could be modeled in other contexts to address the needs of all citizens in vulnerable post-disaster circumstances.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McAdam, Dr Julie and Arizpe, Professor Evelyn and Hirsu, Dr Lavinia
Authors: Hirsu, L., Arizpe, E., and McAdam, J.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Education
Journal Name:International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2212-4209
ISSN (Online):2212-4209
Published Online:13 August 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 The Authors
First Published:First published in International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction 51: 101797
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
300097Arizpe - Network proposalEvelyn ArizpeArts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)AHR004218/1ED - Education