Efficacy of a culture-specific dancing programme to meet current physical activity recommendations in postmenopausal women

Hargan, J., Combet, E. , Dougal, P., McGowan, M., Lumsden, M. A. and Malkova, D. (2020) Efficacy of a culture-specific dancing programme to meet current physical activity recommendations in postmenopausal women. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(16), 5709. (doi: 10.3390/ijerph17165709) (PMID:32784630) (PMCID:PMC7460495)

[img]
Preview
Text
220315.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

628kB

Abstract

This study investigated the efficacy of participation in culture-specific dancing to meet current physical activity recommendations and increase cardio-respiratory fitness in postmenopausal women. Sedentary postmenopausal women (n = 24), aged 63 ± 8 years and with BMI of 28 ± 3 kg/m2 completed a 4-week Scottish dancing study. The dancing sessions of approximately 75 min were performed twice a week and each session was based on five Scottish dances performed in 3 sets. Heart rate (HR) measurements were obtained during all dances to evaluate whether the intervention achieves the criteria of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise intensity. Body composition, waist circumference, and HR during Chester Step test were measured before and after dancing intervention. HR achieved during individual dances ranged from 64 ± 5% to 80 ± 5% of HRmax and the mean HR of the five dances corresponded to 72 ± 7% of HRmax. Post-intervention mean HR was lower throughout Level 2 (Pre, 112 ± 13 bpm; Post, 106 ± 13 bpm; p = 0.005) and Level 3 (Pre, 122 ± 14 bpm; Post, 115 ± 14 bpm; p = 0.006) of the Chester test compared with baseline values. The intervention had no impact on body weight or body fat but reduced waist circumference (Pre, 94 ± 8 cm; Post, 91 ± 9 cm; p = 0.006). Thus, traditional Scottish dancing should be advocated to sedentary postmenopausal women, emphasising its potential in meeting current physical activity recommendations in relation of weekly duration and exercise intensity and improving cardiorespiratory fitness.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Funding: This study was funded by the University of Glasgow (UK).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:MCGOWAN, Mhairi and Malkova, Dr Dalia and Combet Aspray, Professor Emilie and Lumsden, Professor Mary
Authors: Hargan, J., Combet, E., Dougal, P., McGowan, M., Lumsden, M. A., and Malkova, D.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publisher:MDPI
ISSN:1660-4601
ISSN (Online):1660-4601
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 by the authors
First Published:First published in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17(16):5709
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons Licence

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record