Association of SBP and BMI with cognitive and structural brain phenotypes in UK Biobank

Ferguson, A. C. et al. (2020) Association of SBP and BMI with cognitive and structural brain phenotypes in UK Biobank. Journal of Hypertension, 38(12), pp. 2482-2489. (doi: 10.1097/HJH.0000000000002579) (PMID:32665523)

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Abstract

Objective: To test for associations between SBP and BMI, with domain-specific cognitive abilities and examine which brain structural phenotypes mediate those associations. Methods: Using cross-sectional UK Biobank data (final N = 28 412), we examined SBP/BMI vs. cognitive test scores of pairs-matching, matrix completion, trail making test A/B, digit symbol substitution, verbal–numerical reasoning, tower rearranging and simple reaction time. We adjusted for potential confounders of age, sex, deprivation, medication, apolipoprotein e4 genotype, smoking, population stratification and genotypic array. We tested for mediation via multiple structural brain imaging phenotypes and corrected for multiple testing with false discovery rate. Results: We found positive associations for higher BMI with worse reaction time, reasoning, tower rearranging and matrix completion tasks by 0.024–0.067 SDs per BMI SD (all P < 0.001). Higher SBP was associated with worse reasoning (0.034 SDs) and matrix completion scores (−0.024 SDs; both P < 0.001). Both BMI and SBP were associated with multiple brain structural metrics including total grey/white matter volumes, frontal lobe volumes, white matter tract integrity and white matter hyperintensity volumes: specific metrics mediated around one-third of the associations with cognition. Conclusion: Our findings add to the body of evidence that addressing cardiovascular risk factors may also preserve cognitive function, via specific aspects of brain structure.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Cavanagh, Professor Jonathan and Celis, Dr Carlos and Ward, Dr Joey and Ferguson, Ms Amy and Smith, Professor Daniel and Welsh, Dr Paul and Tank, Rachana and McQueenie, Dr Ross and Pell, Professor Jill and Lyall, Dr Laura and Mackay, Professor Daniel and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Lyall, Dr Donald and Strawbridge, Dr Rona
Authors: Ferguson, A. C., Tank, R., Lyall, L. M., Ward, J., Welsh, P., Celis-Morales, C., McQueenie, R., Strawbridge, R. J., Mackay, D. F., Pell, J. P., Smith, D. J., Sattar, N., Cavanagh, J., and Lyall, D. M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Journal of Hypertension
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0263-6352
ISSN (Online):1473-5598
Published Online:15 July 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 The Author(s)
First Published:First published in Journal of Hypertension 38(12):2482-2489
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
302131Understanding the excess risk of cardiometabolic disease in individuals with serious mental illnessJill PellMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/S003061/1HW - Public Health