Physical capability markers used to define sarcopenia and their association with cardiovascular and respiratory outcomes and all-cause mortality: a prospective study from UK Biobank

Petermann-Rocha, F., Ho, K. F., Welsh, P. , Mackay, D. , Brown, R., Gill, J. M.R. , Sattar, N. , Gray, S. R. , Pell, J. P. and Celis-Morales, C. A. (2020) Physical capability markers used to define sarcopenia and their association with cardiovascular and respiratory outcomes and all-cause mortality: a prospective study from UK Biobank. Maturitas, 138, pp. 69-75. (doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2020.04.017) (PMID:32471663)

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Abstract

Introduction It is unclear what combinations of physical capability markers used to define sarcopenia have the strongest associations with health outcomes. Aim To compare the associations between different combinations of physical capability markers of sarcopenia with cardiovascular and respiratory outcomes and all-cause mortality. Study design 469,830 UK Biobank participants were included in this prospective study. Four groups were derived based on combinations of three physical capability markers used to define sarcopenia or severe sarcopenia: gait speed, grip strength and muscle mass. Outcomes studied were all-cause mortality, as well as incidence and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD), respiratory disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Results All combinations of physical capability markers used to define sarcopenia or severe sarcopenia identified individuals at increased risk of respiratory disease and all-cause mortality. However, the definition most strongly associated with a wide range of adverse health outcomes was the combination of slow gait speed plus low muscle mass, followed by severe sarcopenia, and the combination of slow gait speed plus low grip strength. The current definition of sarcopenia (low grip strength plus low muscle mass) had the weakest associations with all-cause (HR: 1.35 [95% CI: 1.07 to 1.71]) and respiratory mortality (HR: 1.88 [95% CI: 1.15 to 3.10]), as well as respiratory disease (HR: 1.38 [95% CI: 1.11 to 1.73]) and COPD incidence (HR: 2.08 [95% CI: 1.14 to 3.79]). Conclusions Associations of sarcopenia with adverse outcomes were strongest when sarcopenia was defined as slow gait speed plus low muscle mass, followed by severe sarcopenia, suggesting that this combination of physical capability markers should be still considered in the diagnosis of sarcopenia.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This research has been conducted using the UK Biobank resource. We are grateful to UK Biobank participants. This research has been conducted using the UK Biobank resource under application number 7155. FP-R receives financial support from the Chilean Government for doing her PhD (ANID-Becas Chile).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Celis, Dr Carlos and Ho, Dr Frederick and Gray, Dr Stuart and Gill, Professor Jason and Brown, Miss Rosemary and Welsh, Dr Paul and Pell, Professor Jill and Mackay, Professor Daniel and Petermann, Mrs Fanny and Sattar, Professor Naveed
Authors: Petermann-Rocha, F., Ho, K. F., Welsh, P., Mackay, D., Brown, R., Gill, J. M.R., Sattar, N., Gray, S. R., Pell, J. P., and Celis-Morales, C. A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Maturitas
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0378-5122
ISSN (Online):1873-4111
Published Online:05 May 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 Elsevier
First Published:First published in Maturitas 138:69-75
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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