The relationship between ECOG-PS, mGPS, BMI/WL grade and body composition and physical function in patients with advanced cancer

Dolan, R. D. et al. (2020) The relationship between ECOG-PS, mGPS, BMI/WL grade and body composition and physical function in patients with advanced cancer. Cancers, 12(5), 1187. (doi: 10.3390/cancers12051187)

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Abstract

Cancer remains one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide and the associated reduction in physical function has a marked impact on both quality of life and survival. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-Performance status (ECOG-PS), modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), Body Mass Index/ Weight Loss grade (BMI/WL grade), and Computerised Tomography (CT)-derived body composition measurement and physical function in patients with advanced cancer. Nine sites contributed prospective data on patient demographics, ECOG-PS, mGPS, physical function tests, and CT-derived body composition. Categorical variables were analysed using χ2 test for linear-by-linear association, or χ2 test for 2-by-2 tables. Associations were analysed using binary logistic regression. A total of 523 cancer patients (266 males, 257 females) were included in the final analysis and most had metastatic disease (83.2%). The median overall survival was 5.6 months. On multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, a high ECOG-PS remained independently associated with a low skeletal muscle index (p < 0.001), low skeletal muscle density (p < 0.05), and timed up and go test failure (p < 0.001). A high mGPS remained independently associated with a low skeletal muscle density (p < 0.05) and hand grip strength test failure (p < 0.01). A high BMI/WL grade remained independently associated with a low subcutaneous fat index (p < 0.05), low visceral obesity (p < 0.01), and low skeletal muscle density (p < 0.05). In conclusion, a high ECOG-PS and a high mGPS as outlined in the ECOG-PS/mGPS framework were consistently associated with poorer body composition and physical function in patients with advanced cancer.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This research was funded by Medical Research Scotland (487FRG), the University of Glasgow, the University of Edinburgh, and University College Cork.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McMillan, Professor Donald and Dolan, Dr Ross and Laird, Dr Barry
Authors: Dolan, R. D., Daly, L. E., Simmons, C. P.L., Ryan, A. M., Sim, W. M.J., Fallon, M., Power, D. G., Wilcock, A., Maddocks, M., Bennett, M. I., Usborne, C., Laird, B. J., and McMillan, D. C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Cancers
Publisher:MDPI
ISSN:2072-6694
ISSN (Online):2072-6694
Published Online:08 May 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 The Authors
First Published:First published in Cancers 12(5): 1187
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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