High willingness to use drug consumption rooms among people who inject drugs in Scotland: findings from a national bio-behavioural survey among people who inject drugs

Trayner, K. M.A. et al. (2020) High willingness to use drug consumption rooms among people who inject drugs in Scotland: findings from a national bio-behavioural survey among people who inject drugs. International Journal of Drug Policy, (doi: 10.1016/j.drugpo.2020.102731) (PMID:32331859) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: To address rising drug-related harms (including significant transmission of HIV) among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Glasgow, officials have proposed the introduction of the UK's first drug consumption room (DCR) in Glasgow city centre. Using a nationally representative sample, this study aimed to determine willingness to use a DCR among PWID nationally, in Glasgow city centre (the proposed DCR location), other Scottish city centres (excluding Glasgow) and the rest of Scotland (excluding city centres). METHODS: Bio-behavioural survey, of 1469 current PWID (injected in last 6 months) across Scotland during 2017-18. Willingness to use DCRs was examined by drug-related risk behaviours and harms overall in Scotland, and then stratified by Glasgow city centre (n = 219), other Scottish city centres (n = 226) and the rest of Scotland (n = 1024). RESULTS: The majority of PWID overall in Scotland (75%) were willing to use a DCR; willingness was higher among those recruited in Glasgow city centre (83%) and other Scottish city centres (83%), compared to the rest of Scotland (72%) (p < 0.001). Willingness was greater among PWID who reported (compared to those who did not report) injecting heroin (76%, p = 0.002), cocaine injecting (79%, p = 0.014), homelessness (86%, p < 0.001), public injecting (87%, p < 0.001) and an overdose (80%, p = 0.026). Willingness was found to be associated with a cumulative multiple risk variable: increased from 66% among those with a score of zero to 85% with a score of at least three (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The vast majority of PWID at greatest risk of drug-related harm in Glasgow and elsewhere in Scotland would be willing to use a DCR, supporting proposals for the introduction of DCRs nationally.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Priyadarshi, Dr Saket and Gunson, Dr Rory and Tweed, Dr Emily and Hutchison, Dr Sharon and Shepherd, Dr Samantha and Goldberg, Prof David
Creator Roles:
Hutchison, S. J.Conceptualization, Project administration, Methodology, Supervision, Writing – review and editing, Funding acquisition
Goldberg, D. J.Conceptualization, Writing – review and editing, Funding acquisition
Shepherd, S. J.Investigation, Writing – review and editing
Gunson, R. N.Investigation, Writing – review and editing
Tweed, E. J.Writing – review and editing
Priyadarshi, S.Writing – review and editing
Authors: Trayner, K. M.A., Palmateer, N. E., Hutchison, S. J., Goldberg, D. J., Shepherd, S. J., Gunson, R., Tweed, E. J., Priyadarshi, S., Sumnall, H., Atkinson, A., and McAuley, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:International Journal of Drug Policy
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0955-3959
ISSN (Online):1873-4758
Published Online:22 April 2020
Copyright Holders:Crown Copyright © 2020
First Published:First published in International Journal of Drug Policy 2020
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons licence

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
MC_UU_12017/13
MC_UU_12017/15
SPSHU13
SPHSU15
301147Morbidity and mortality among people experiencing severe and multiple disadvantage: a cohort study using cross-sectoral data linkageEmily TweedChief Scientist Office (CSO)CAF/17/11HW - MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit