Imitating the obscene: Henry Higden’s versions of Horace’s Satire 1.2 and Juvenal’s Satire 6

Gillespie, S. (2020) Imitating the obscene: Henry Higden’s versions of Horace’s Satire 1.2 and Juvenal’s Satire 6. Translation and Literature, 29(2), pp. 199-219. (doi: 10.3366/tal.2020.0418)

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Abstract

Henry Higden has hitherto been known, if at all, for two works of English classical imitation: of Juvenal's Satire 13 (printed 1686) and Satire 10 (printed 1687), the second an influence on Dryden. Other than a failed stage play, these are Higden's sole recorded works. This article argues that he was also the author of two closely related imitations, probably also composed in the late 1680s but circulated anonymously, and both extant in manuscript copies. Higden's versions tend to make more rather than less emphatic the sexual content of these Latin poems, providing a reason why one who was called to the bar in 1686 and well known in polite circles would not have wished to claim them publicly as his work. A text of the 313-line Horatian imitation is printed for the first time within this contribution.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gillespie, Dr Stuart
Authors: Gillespie, S.
College/School:College of Arts > School of Critical Studies > English Literature
Journal Name:Translation and Literature
Publisher:Edinburgh University Press
ISSN:0968-1361
ISSN (Online):1750-0214
Copyright Holders:Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
First Published:First published in 29(2):199-219
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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