Beyond cycle lanes and large-scale infrastructure: a scoping review of initiatives that groups and organisations can implement to promote cycling for the Cycle Nation Project

Kelly, P. et al. (2020) Beyond cycle lanes and large-scale infrastructure: a scoping review of initiatives that groups and organisations can implement to promote cycling for the Cycle Nation Project. British Journal of Sports Medicine, (doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2019-101447) (PMID:32269057) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Background/objectives: Cycling has well-established positive relationships with health. Evidence suggests that large-scale infrastructure and built-environment initiatives to promote cycling are likely to be necessary but not sufficient to maximise cycling participation. Smaller-scale initiatives that can be implemented by organisations (eg, employers) and groups (eg, community groups) are therefore also important, but the full range of feasible activities to promote cycling is not known. We aimed to scope the literature and map organisational, social and individual level activities to increase cycling. Methods Design: Scoping review following an established five-stage process. Eligibility criteria: Studies or publicly available reports describing cycling promotion initiatives deemed feasible for organisations or groups to implement. Sources of evidence and selection: (i) online databases (Ovid (Medline), Ovid (Embase), SportDISCUS (Ebscohost), ProQuest, Web of Science), (ii) existing systematic reviews, (iii) expert stakeholder consultation. Results: We extracted data from 129 studies and reports, from 20 different countries, identifying 145 cycling promotion initiatives. From these initiatives we identified 484 actions within 93 action types within 33 action categories under the nine intervention functions described by Michie et al. Environmental restructuring (micro-level), enablement, education and persuasion were the functions with the most action types, while coercion, modelling and restriction had the fewest action types. Conclusion: This is the first comprehensive map to summarise the broad range of action types feasible for implementation within organisation/group-based cycling promotion initiatives. The map will be a critical tool for communities, employers, practitioners and researchers in designing interventions to increase cycling.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Funding: This work was funded by British Cycling and HSBC-UK as part of the Cycle Nation Project.
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gray, Professor Cindy and Gill, Professor Jason and Logan, Dr Greig and Connell, Miss Hayley and Pell, Professor Jill
Authors: Kelly, P., Williamson, C., Baker, G., Davis, A., Broadfield, S., Coles, A., Logan, G., Connell, H., Pell, J. P., Gray, C., and Gill, J. M.R.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Social Scientists working in Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:British Journal of Sports Medicine
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0306-3674
ISSN (Online):1473-0480
Published Online:08 April 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020
First Published:First published in British Journal of Sports Medicine 2020
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

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