Comparison of the prognostic value of ECOG-PS, mGPS and BMI/WL: implications for a clinically important framework in the assessment and treatment of advanced cancer

Dolan, R. D. , Daly, L., Sim, W. M.J., Fallon, M., Ryan, A., McMillan, D. C. and Laird, B. J. (2019) Comparison of the prognostic value of ECOG-PS, mGPS and BMI/WL: implications for a clinically important framework in the assessment and treatment of advanced cancer. Clinical Nutrition, (doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2019.12.024) (PMID:31926762) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:The systemic inflammatory response is associated with the loss of lean tissue, anorexia, weakness, fatigue and reduced survival in patients with advanced cancer and therefore is important in the definition of cancer cachexia. The aim of the present study was to carry out a direct comparison of the prognostic value of Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG-PS), modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) and Body Mass Index/Weight Loss Grade (BMI/WL grade) in patients with advanced cancer. METHOD:All data were collected prospectively across 18 sites in the UK and Ireland. Patient's age, sex, ECOG-PS, mGPS and BMI/WL grade were recorded, as were details of underlying disease including metastases. Survival data were analysed using univariate and multivariate Cox regression. RESULTS:A total of 730 patients were assessed. The majority of patients were male (53%), over 65 years of age (56%), had an ECOG-PS>0/1 (56%), mGPS≥1 (56%), BMI≥25 (51%), <2.5% weight loss (57%) and had metastatic disease (86%). On multivariate cox regression analysis ECOG-PS (HR 1.61 95%CI 1.42-1.83, p < 0.001), mGPS (HR 1.53, 95%CI 1.39-1.69, p < 0.001) and BMI/WL grade (HR 1.41, 95%CI 1.25-1.60, p < 0.001) remained independently associated with overall survival. In patients with a BMI/WL grade 0/1 both ECOG and mGPS remained independently associated with overall survival. CONCLUSION:The ECOG/mGPS framework may form the basis of risk stratification of survival in patients with advanced cancer.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Advanced cancer, body composition, ECOG, Glasgow prognostic score, physical function testing, systemic inflammation.
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Dolan, Dr Ross and McMillan, Professor Donald
Authors: Dolan, R. D., Daly, L., Sim, W. M.J., Fallon, M., Ryan, A., McMillan, D. C., and Laird, B. J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Clinical Nutrition
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0261-5614
ISSN (Online):1532-1983
Published Online:27 December 2019

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