Long-term behavioural outcomes after paediatric convulsive status epilepticus: a population-based cohort study

Martinos, M. M., Pujar, S., Gillberg, C. , Cortina-Borja, M., Neville, B. G.R., De Haan, M., Scott, R. C. and Chin, R. F.M. (2018) Long-term behavioural outcomes after paediatric convulsive status epilepticus: a population-based cohort study. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 60(4), pp. 409-416. (doi: 10.1111/dmcn.13636) (PMID:29226310) (PMCID:PMC5900729)

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Abstract

Aim: To describe behavioural and psychiatric outcomes of children within 10 years of convulsive status epilepticus (CSE). Method: Children originally identified by the population‐based North London Convulsive Status Epilepticus in Childhood Surveillance Study were followed‐up between July 2009 and February 2013. They were grouped into epilepsy‐ and non‐epilepsy‐related CSE, and compared with population norms and healthy controls using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire; the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire; and the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham questionnaire. Children who scored above recommended clinical cut‐offs on any scale were invited for a neuropsychiatric assessment. Regression models were fitted to identify clinically relevant covariates associated with behavioural outcomes. Results: At a mean follow‐up of 8.1 years post‐CSE, 28% of enrolled children were found to have a psychiatric disorder. Children with epilepsy‐related CSE scored higher than norms on all scales and children with non‐epilepsy‐related CSE scored higher than norms on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire. Presence of seizures at baseline and recurrence of CSE was associated with worse outcomes in the group with epilepsy. Intellectual abilities were associated with behavioural outcomes in all participants. Interpretation: A large proportion of children manifest behavioural issues 8 years after CSE. The present data highlight the need for behavioural screening in children with neurodevelopmental impairments post‐CSE.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This research study was funded by the Academy of Medical Sciences, the Bupa Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, Young Epilepsy, the Medical Research Council, and supported by the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust and University College London.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gillberg, Professor Christopher
Authors: Martinos, M. M., Pujar, S., Gillberg, C., Cortina-Borja, M., Neville, B. G.R., De Haan, M., Scott, R. C., and Chin, R. F.M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Publisher:Wiley for Mac Keith Press
ISSN:0012-1622
ISSN (Online):1469-8749
Published Online:10 December 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology 60:409-416
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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