Global development and adaptive behaviour in children with early-onset epilepsy: a population-based case-control study

Reilly, C., Atkinson, P., Memon, A., Jones, C., Dabydeen, L., Das, K. B., Gillberg, C. , Neville, B. G.R., Mahoney, J. M. and Scott, R. C. (2019) Global development and adaptive behaviour in children with early-onset epilepsy: a population-based case-control study. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 61(2), pp. 145-151. (doi: 10.1111/dmcn.13926) (PMID:29862505)

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Abstract

AIM:There are limited population-based data on global development and adaptive behaviour in children with early-onset epilepsy. The aims of this study were: (1) to identify the prevalence of deficits in global development and adaptive behaviour experienced by children with early-onset epilepsy; (2) to identify factors associated with such deficits; and (3) to compare the relationship between measures of neurodevelopment in the group with epilepsy to a group without epilepsy who had other neurological or neurodevelopmental difficulties. METHOD:The Sussex Early Epilepsy and Neurobehaviour study is a prospective, community-based study involving children (1-7y) with epilepsy. We undertook comprehensive psychological assessment with participants, including measures of global development and adaptive behaviour. We compared the children with epilepsy with a sex, age, and developmentally-matched group of children without epilepsy who had neurodevelopmental or neurological difficulties using correlation matrices. RESULTS:Forty-eight children (91% of the eligible population) with epilepsy underwent assessment. Seventy-one per cent of children displayed delayed global development (<2SD) and 56% showed significant deficits (<2SD) in adaptive behaviour. Our analysis revealed that non-white ethnicity and use of polytherapy were independently associated with decreased scores on measures of global development and adaptive behaviour. The correlations between measures of developmental functioning were higher in children with epilepsy than in those without. INTERPRETATION:Children with early-onset epilepsy frequently have difficulties with global development and adaptive behaviour. The higher correlations between neurodevelopmental measures in children with epilepsy suggest that the profile in children with epilepsy is different. This may have significant implications for both neuropathology and interventions. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:Children with early-onset epilepsy are at significant risk of intellectual disability. Developmental impairment is associated with use of polytherapy but not with any seizure parameters. Developmental profiles in young children with epilepsy differ from other conditions.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:The Sussex Early Epilepsy and Neurobehaviour study was funded by the George E. Neville Foundation and Young Epilepsy.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gillberg, Professor Christopher
Authors: Reilly, C., Atkinson, P., Memon, A., Jones, C., Dabydeen, L., Das, K. B., Gillberg, C., Neville, B. G.R., Mahoney, J. M., and Scott, R. C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Publisher:Wiley, for Mac Keith Press
ISSN:0012-1622
ISSN (Online):1469-8749
Published Online:03 June 2018

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