Comparing the interobserver reproducibility of different regions of interest on multi-parametric renal magnetic resonance imaging in healthy volunteers, patients with heart failure and renal transplant recipients

Rankin, A. J. et al. (2020) Comparing the interobserver reproducibility of different regions of interest on multi-parametric renal magnetic resonance imaging in healthy volunteers, patients with heart failure and renal transplant recipients. Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine, 33, pp. 103-112. (doi: 10.1007/s10334-019-00809-4) (PMID:31823275) (PMCID:PMC7021749)

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Abstract

Objective: To assess interobserver reproducibility of different regions of interest (ROIs) on multi-parametric renal MRI using commercially available software. Materials and methods: Healthy volunteers (HV), patients with heart failure (HF) and renal transplant recipients (Tx) were recruited. Localiser scans, T1 mapping and pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL) were performed. HV and Tx also underwent diffusion-weighted imaging to allow calculation of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). For T1, pCASL and ADC, ROIs were drawn for whole kidney (WK), cortex (Cx), user-defined representative cortex (rep-Cx) and medulla. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CoV) were assessed. Results: Forty participants were included (10 HV, 10 HF and 20 Tx). The ICC for renal volume was 0.97 and CoV 6.5%. For T1 and ADC, WK, Cx, and rep-Cx were highly reproducible with ICC ≥ 0.76 and CoV < 5%. However, cortical pCASL results were more variable (ICC > 0.86, but CoV up to 14.2%). While reproducible, WK values were derived from a wide spread of data (ROI standard deviation 17% to 55% of the mean value for ADC and pCASL, respectively). Renal volume differed between groups (p < 0.001), while mean cortical T1 values were greater in Tx compared to HV (p = 0.009) and HF (p = 0.02). Medullary T1 values were also higher in Tx than HV (p = 0.03), while medullary pCASL values were significantly lower in Tx compared to HV and HF (p = 0.03 for both). Discussion: Kidney volume calculated by manually contouring a localiser scan was highly reproducible between observers and detected significant differences across patient groups. For T1, pCASL and ADC, Cx and rep-Cx ROIs are generally reproducible with advantages over WK values.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gillis, Dr Keith and Roditi, Dr Giles and Lee, Matthew and Rankin, Dr Alastair and Mark, Dr Patrick and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Woodward, Miss Rosie and Radjenovic, Dr Aleksandra and Allwood-Spiers, Sarah
Authors: Rankin, A. J., Allwood-Spiers, S., Lee, M. M.Y., Zhu, L., Woodward, R., Kuehn, B., Radjenovic, A., Sattar, N., Roditi, G., Mark, P. B., and Gillis, K. A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0968-5243
ISSN (Online):1352-8661
Published Online:10 December 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 The Authors
First Published:First published in Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine 33:103-112
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
303352INTERROGATION OF THE CARDIOMYOPATHY OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE WITH ADVANCED CARDIAC IMAGINGAlastair RankinChief Scientist Office (CSO)CAF/18/02CAMS - Cardiovascular Science
305405A clinical-pathological study into the diagnostic utility of multiparametric MRI in the setting of kidney transplant dysfunctionPatrick MarkKidney Research UK (KIDNEYRE)KS_IN_002_20180913CAMS - Cardiovascular Science