Feasibility trial of a digital self-management intervention ‘My Breathing Matters’ to improve asthma-related quality of life for UK primary care patients with asthma

Ainsworth, B., Greenwell, K., Stuart, B., Raftery, J., Mair, F. , Bruton, A., Yardley, L. and Thomas, M. (2019) Feasibility trial of a digital self-management intervention ‘My Breathing Matters’ to improve asthma-related quality of life for UK primary care patients with asthma. BMJ Open, 9(11), e032465. (doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-032465) (PMID:31722952) (PMCID:PMC6858238)

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Abstract

Objective: To assess the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) and acceptability of an asthma self-management digital intervention to improve asthma-specific quality of life in comparison with usual care. Design and setting: A two-arm feasibility RCT conducted across seven general practices in Wessex, UK. Participants: Primary care patients with asthma aged 18 years and over, with impaired asthma-specific quality of life and access to the internet. Interventions: ‘My Breathing Matters’ (MBM) is a digital asthma self-management intervention designed using theory, evidence and person-based approaches to provide tailored support for both pharmacological and non-pharmacological management of asthma symptoms. Outcomes: The primary outcome was the feasibility of the trial design, including recruitment, adherence and retention at follow-up (3 and 12 months). Secondary outcomes were the feasibility and effect sizes of specific trial measures including asthma-specific quality of life and asthma control. Results: Primary outcomes: 88 patients were recruited (target 80). At 3-month follow-up, two patients withdrew and six did not complete outcome measures. At 12 months, two withdrew and four did not complete outcome measures. 36/44 patients in the intervention group engaged with MBM (median of 4 logins, range 0–25, IQR 8). Consistent trends were observed to improvements in asthma-related patient-reported outcome measures. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility and acceptability of a definitive RCT that is required to determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a digital asthma self-management intervention. Trial registration number: ISRCTN15698435.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Mair, Professor Frances
Authors: Ainsworth, B., Greenwell, K., Stuart, B., Raftery, J., Mair, F., Bruton, A., Yardley, L., and Thomas, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
Journal Name:BMJ Open
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:2044-6055
ISSN (Online):2044-6055
Published Online:12 November 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © Authors (or their employers) 2019
First Published:First published in BMJ Open 9(11):e032465
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
169877Integrating Digital Interventions into Patient Self-Management Support (DIPSS)Frances MairNational Institute for Health Research (NIHR)RP-PG-1211-20001HW - General Practice and Primary Care