Changing logics in healthcare and their effects on the identity motives and identity work of doctors

Martin, G., Bushfield, S., Siebert, S. and Howieson, B. (2020) Changing logics in healthcare and their effects on the identity motives and identity work of doctors. Organization Studies, (doi:10.1177/0170840619895871) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Recent literature on hybridity has provided useful insights into how professionals have responded to changing institutional logics. Our focus in on how shifting logics have shaped senior medical professionals’ identity motives and identity work in a qualitative study of hospital consultants in the UK NHS. We found a binary divide between a large category of traditionalist doctors who reject shifting logics, and a much smaller category of incorporated consultants who broadly accept shifting logics and advocate change, with little evidence of significant ambivalence or temporary identity ‘fixes’ associated with liminality. By developing a new inductively-generated framework, we show how the identity motives and identity work of these two categories of doctors differ significantly. We explore the underlying causes of these differences, and the implications they hold for theory and practice in medical professionalism, medical professional leadership and healthcare reform.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was supported by the British Medical Association Scottish Consultants Committee.
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Siebert, Professor Sabina and Martin, Professor Graeme
Authors: Martin, G., Bushfield, S., Siebert, S., and Howieson, B.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > Adam Smith Business School > Management
Journal Name:Organization Studies
Publisher:SAGE Publications
ISSN:0170-8406
ISSN (Online):1741-3044
Published Online:24 January 2020
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 The Authors
First Published:First published in Organization Studies 2020
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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