The effect of anesthesia on the postoperative systemic inflammatory response in patients undergoing surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Alhayyan, A. , McSorley, S. , Roxburgh, C. , Kearns, R. , Horgan, P. and McMillan, D. (2020) The effect of anesthesia on the postoperative systemic inflammatory response in patients undergoing surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Surgery Open Science, 2(1), pp. 1-21. (doi: 10.1016/j.sopen.2019.06.001)

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Abstract

Background: Surgical injury stimulates the systemic inflammatory response. The magnitude of the postoperative systemic inflammatory response has been shown to be significantly associated with short and long-term outcomes following surgery of varying severity. Different anesthetic techniques for surgery may have an impact on the postoperative systemic inflammatory response and on the rate of the postoperative infective complications. The aim of the present systematic review was to examine the relationship between perioperative anesthesia, the postoperative systemic inflammatory response and postoperative infective complications in patients undergoing surgery. Methods: This was carried out using PubMed and other established databases from 1987 up to March 2018. In particular, randomized controlled studies and systemic inflammation markers, interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein were examined. Results: Overall, 60 controlled, randomized clinical trials were included in the review. The mean or median values of both interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein were taken for each study and the mean value was calculated for each anesthetic group at sampling points of 12–24 and 24–72 hours for interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein respectively. When taking the magnitude of surgery into account, TIVA using propofol was significantly associated with a reduction in particular C-reactive protein (P = .04). However, there were no other specific anesthetic methods including general, regional and combined anesthetics that were associated with a reduction in either interleukin 6 or C-reactive protein. Conclusion: There is some evidence that anesthetic regimens may reduce the magnitude of the postoperative systemic inflammatory response. However, the studies were heterogeneous and generally of low quality. Future, well conducted, adequately powered studies are required to clarify the effect of anesthesia on the postoperative systemic inflammatory response and infective complications.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Funding of this work was received from Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Horgan, Professor Paul and ALHAYYAN, ALIAH and Kearns, Dr Rachel and McMillan, Professor Donald and Roxburgh, Dr Campbell and McSorley, Dr Stephen
Authors: Alhayyan, A., McSorley, S., Roxburgh, C., Kearns, R., Horgan, P., and McMillan, D.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Surgery Open Science
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2589-8450
Published Online:29 June 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 The Authors
First Published:First published in Surgery Open Science 2(1): 1-21
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

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