Aerobic interval training enhances cardiomyocyte contractility and Ca2+ cycling by phosphorylation of CaMKII and Thr-17 of phospholamban

Kemi, O., Ellingsen, O., Ceci, M., Grimaldi, S., Smith, G. , Condorelli, G. and Wisloff, U. (2007) Aerobic interval training enhances cardiomyocyte contractility and Ca2+ cycling by phosphorylation of CaMKII and Thr-17 of phospholamban. Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, 43(3), pp. 354-361. (doi:10.1016/j.yjmcc.2007.06.013)

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Abstract

Cardiac adaptation to aerobic exercise training includes improved cardiomyocyte contractility and calcium handling. Our objective was to determine whether cytosolic calcium/calmodulin -dependent kinase 11 and its downstream targets are modulated by exercise training. A six-week aerobic interval training program by treadmill running increased maximal oxygen uptake by 35% in adult mice, whereupon left ventricular cardiomyocyte function was studied and myocardial tissue samples were used for biochemical analysis. Cardiomyocytes from trained mice had enhanced contractility and faster relaxation rates, which coincided with larger amplitude and faster decay of the calcium transient, but not increased peak systolic calcium levels. These changes were associated with reduced phospholamban expression relative to sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase and constitutively increased phosphorylation of phospholamban at the threonine 17, but not at the serine 16 site. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase 116 phosphorylation was increased at threonine 287, indicating activation. To investigate the physiological role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase 116 phosphorylation, this kinase was blocked specifically by autocamtide-2 related inhibitory peptide II. This maneuver completely abolished training-induced improvements of cardiomyocyte contractility and calcium handling and blunted, but did not completely abolish the training-induced increase in Ca2+ sensitivity. Also, inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase 11 reduced the greater frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation that was observed after aerobic interval training. These observations indicate that calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase 116 contributes significantly to the functional adaptation of the cardiomyocyte to regular exercise training.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Smith, Professor Godfrey and Kemi, Dr Ole
Authors: Kemi, O., Ellingsen, O., Ceci, M., Grimaldi, S., Smith, G., Condorelli, G., and Wisloff, U.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences
Journal Name:Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-2828

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