The relation between Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), computed tomography-derived body composition, systemic inflammation, and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer.

Almasaudi, A. S., McSorley, S. T. , Dolan, R. D. , Edwards, C. A. and McMillan, D. C. (2019) The relation between Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), computed tomography-derived body composition, systemic inflammation, and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 110(6), pp. 1327-1334. (doi: 10.1093/ajcn/nqz230) (PMID:31529042)

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Abstract

Nutritional status is an important factor affecting a patient's clinical outcomes. Early identification of patients who are at risk of malnutrition is important to improve clinical outcomes and reduce health cost. The Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) has been recommended as part of the routine nursing assessment for all patients at hospital admission. The aim of this study was to examine the association between nutritional status (MUST), systemic inflammatory response (SIR), body composition, and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. The malnutrition risk was examined using MUST in patients admitted for surgery for colorectal cancer between March 2013 and June 2016. Preoperative computed tomography scans were used to define the body composition. The presence of SIR was evidenced by the modified Glasgow prognostic score and the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio. Postoperative complications, severity of complication, length of hospital stay, and mortality were considered as outcome measures. The study included 363 patients (199 males, 164 females); 21% of the patients presented with a medium or high nutritional risk. There were significant associations between MUST and subcutaneous adiposity (P < 0.001), visceral obesity (P < 0.001), and low skeletal muscle index (P < 0.001). No statistically significant association was identified between MUST score and presence of any complication or severity of complication. On multivariate analysis, MUST remained independently associated with the length of hospital stay (OR: 2.17; 95% CI: 1.45, 3.26; P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed an increased number of deaths for patients at medium or high risk of malnutrition (P < 0.001). This association was found to be independent of other confounding factors (HR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.99; P = 0.020). MUST score is an independent marker of risk in those undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer and should remain a key part of preoperative assessment.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool, body composition, colorectal cancer, nutrition screening, systemic inflammatory response.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Edwards, Professor Christine and Dolan, Dr Ross and Almasaudi, Arwa and McMillan, Professor Donald and McSorley, Dr Stephen
Authors: Almasaudi, A. S., McSorley, S. T., Dolan, R. D., Edwards, C. A., and McMillan, D. C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0002-9165
ISSN (Online):1938-3207
Published Online:16 September 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 American Society for Nutrition
First Published:First published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 110(6):1327-1334
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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