Depression and anxiety among people living with and beyond cancer: a growing clinical and research priority

Niedzwiedz, C. L. , Knifton, L., Robb, K. A. , Katikireddi, S. V. and Smith, D. J. (2019) Depression and anxiety among people living with and beyond cancer: a growing clinical and research priority. BMC Cancer, 19, 943. (doi:10.1186/s12885-019-6181-4) (PMID:31604468) (PMCID:PMC6788022)

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Abstract

Background: A cancer diagnosis can have a substantial impact on mental health and wellbeing. Depression and anxiety may hinder cancer treatment and recovery, as well as quality of life and survival. We argue that more research is needed to prevent and treat co-morbid depression and anxiety among people with cancer and that it requires greater clinical priority. For background and to support our argument, we synthesise existing systematic reviews relating to cancer and common mental disorders, focusing on depression and anxiety. We searched several electronic databases for relevant reviews on cancer, depression and anxiety from 2012 to 2019. Several areas are covered: factors that may contribute to the development of common mental disorders among people with cancer; the prevalence of depression and anxiety; and potential care and treatment options. We also make several recommendations for future research. Numerous individual, psychological, social and contextual factors potentially contribute to the development of depression and anxiety among people with cancer, as well as characteristics related to the cancer and treatment received. Compared to the general population, the prevalence of depression and anxiety is often found to be higher among people with cancer, but estimates vary due to several factors, such as the treatment setting, type of cancer and time since diagnosis. Overall, there are a lack of high-quality studies into the mental health of people with cancer following treatment and among long-term survivors, particularly for the less prevalent cancer types and younger people. Studies that focus on prevention are minimal and research covering low- and middle-income populations is limited. Conclusion: Research is urgently needed into the possible impacts of long-term and late effects of cancer treatment on mental health and how these may be prevented, as increasing numbers of people live with and beyond cancer.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Katikireddi, Dr Vittal and Smith, Professor Daniel and Robb, Dr Katie and Niedzwiedz, Dr Claire
Authors: Niedzwiedz, C. L., Knifton, L., Robb, K. A., Katikireddi, S. V., and Smith, D. J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:BMC Cancer
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-2407
ISSN (Online):1471-2407

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
302182A machine learning approach to understanding comorbidity between mental and physical health conditionsJill PellMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/R024774/1HW - Public Health
172690Understanding the impacts of welfare policy on health: A novel data linkage studySrinivasa KatikireddiChief Scientist Office (CSO)SCAF/15/02HW - Public Health
190877Quinquennial Core FundsLaurence MooreMedical Research Council (MRC)Moore, Professor LaurenceHW - MRC/CSO SPHSU Support Services
SPHSU13
SPHSU15

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