Towards a unified view on pathways and functions of neural recurrent processing

Pennartz, C. M.A., Dora, S., Muckli, L. and Lorteije, J. A.M. (2019) Towards a unified view on pathways and functions of neural recurrent processing. Trends in Neurosciences, 42(9), pp. 589-603. (doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2019.07.005) (PMID:31399289)

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Abstract

There are three neural feedback pathways to the primary visual cortex (V1): corticocortical, pulvinocortical, and cholinergic. What are the respective functions of these three projections? Possible functions range from contextual modulation of stimulus processing and feedback of high-level information to predictive processing (PP). How are these functions subserved by different pathways and can they be integrated into an overarching theoretical framework? We propose that corticocortical and pulvinocortical connections are involved in all three functions, whereas the role of cholinergic projections is limited by their slow response to stimuli. PP provides a broad explanatory framework under which stimulus-context modulation and high-level processing are subsumed, involving multiple feedback pathways that provide mechanisms for inferring and interpreting what sensory inputs are about.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This project has received funding from the EU’s Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation under the Specific Grant Agreement (SGA2) 785907 Human Brain Project (C.M.A.P. and L.M.).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Muckli, Professor Lars
Authors: Pennartz, C. M.A., Dora, S., Muckli, L., and Lorteije, J. A.M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Trends in Neurosciences
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0166-2236
ISSN (Online):1878-108X
Published Online:06 August 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 The Authors
First Published:First published in Trends in Neurosciences 42(9):589-603
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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