Covalent immobilization of biomolecules on stent materials through mussel adhesive protein coating to form biofunctional films

Wang, Y. et al. (2020) Covalent immobilization of biomolecules on stent materials through mussel adhesive protein coating to form biofunctional films. Materials Science and Engineering C: Biomimetic and Supramolecular Systems, 106, 110187. (doi:10.1016/j.msec.2019.110187)

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Abstract

It is widely accepted that surface biofunctional modification may be an effective approach to improve biocompatibility and confer new bioactive properties on biomaterials. In this work, mussel adhesive protein (MAP) was applied as a coating on 316 L stainless steel substrates (316 L SS) and stents, and then either immobilized VEGF or CD34 antibody were added to create biofunctional films. The properties of the MAP coating were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM) and a water contact angle test. Universal tensile testing showed that the MAP coating has adequate adhesion strength on a 316 L stainless steel material surface. Subsequent cytotoxicity and hemolysis rate tests showed that the MAP coatings have good biocompatibility. Moreover, using N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N′-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride and N-hydroxysulfosussinimide (EDC/NHS) chemistry, VEGF and CD34 antibody were immobilized on the MAP coatings. The amount and immobilized yield of VEGF on the MAP coatings were analyzed by enzyme-linked immuno-assays (ELISA). Finally, an endothelial cells culture showed that the VEGF biofunctional film can promote the viability and proliferation of endothelial cells. An in vitro CD34+ cells capturing test also verified the bioactive properties of the CD34 antibody coated stents. These results showed that the MAP coatings allowed effective biomolecule immobilization, providing a promising platform for vascular device modification.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This research program was partially supported by grants from Chongqing Science and Technology Bureau (cstc2019jcyj - zdxm0033) of China; the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31971242, 11572064); the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2016YFC1102305); the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (2018cdptcg0001-10) as well as the Public Experiment Center of State Bioindustrial Base (Chongqing), China and the National "111 plan" (B06023).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Mcginty, Dr Sean and Gao, Dr Hao
Authors: Wang, Y., Lan, H., Yin, T., Zhang, X., Huang, J., Fu, H., Huang, J., McGinty, S., Gao, H., Wang, G., and Wang, Z.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Biomedical Engineering
College of Science and Engineering > School of Mathematics and Statistics > Mathematics
Journal Name:Materials Science and Engineering C: Biomimetic and Supramolecular Systems
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0928-4931
ISSN (Online):1873-0191
Published Online:10 September 2019

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