Isometric versus isotonic exercise for greater trochanteric pain syndrome: a randomised controlled pilot study

Clifford, C., Paul, L., Syme, G. and Millar, N. L. (2019) Isometric versus isotonic exercise for greater trochanteric pain syndrome: a randomised controlled pilot study. BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine, 5(1), e000558. (doi:10.1136/bmjsem-2019-000558)

Clifford, C., Paul, L., Syme, G. and Millar, N. L. (2019) Isometric versus isotonic exercise for greater trochanteric pain syndrome: a randomised controlled pilot study. BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine, 5(1), e000558. (doi:10.1136/bmjsem-2019-000558)

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Abstract

Objectives: Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a common cause of lateral hip pain. Limited evidence exists for the effectiveness of exercise for GTPS. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of isometric and isotonic exercise for individuals with GTPS. Methods: This randomised controlled pilot trial recruited 30 participants with GTPS. Both programmes consisted of daily, progressive home exercise for 12 weeks with 8 individual physiotherapy sessions over the trial period. The primary outcome measure was the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Gluteal (VISA-G) and secondary outcome measures included the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (0–10) and an 11-point Global Rating of Change Scale. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline, 4 and 12 weeks. Results: Twenty-three participants completed the trial. After 12 weeks, mean VISA-G scores improved in both groups; 55–65 in the isometric group and 62–72 in the isotonic group. 55% of the isometric group and 58% of the isotonic group achieved a reduction in pain of at least 2 points (minimally clinically important difference (MCID)) on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. 64% of the isometric group and 75% of the isotonic group had improved by at least 2 points (MCID) on the Global Rating of Change Scale. Conclusion: Isometric and isotonic exercise programmes appear to be effective for individuals with GTPS and should be considered in the loading management of patients with this condition.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Clifford, Christopher and Millar, Dr Neal and Paul, Dr Lorna
Authors: Clifford, C., Paul, L., Syme, G., and Millar, N. L.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care
Journal Name:BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:2055-7647
ISSN (Online):2055-7647
Published Online:21 September 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 Authors (or their employers)
First Published:First published in BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine 5(1):e000558
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
3015150Damage mechanisms in tendon diseaseNeal MillarMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/R020515/1III - Immunology
725711HMGB1: a key damage mediator in tendinopathyNeal MillarArthritis Research UK (ARTRESUK)21346III -IMMUNOLOGY