In the name of parliamentary sovereignty: how the conflict between the UK government and the courts over prisoner voting rights was really about executive power

Hardman, H. (2019) In the name of parliamentary sovereignty: how the conflict between the UK government and the courts over prisoner voting rights was really about executive power. [Website]

Hardman, H. (2019) In the name of parliamentary sovereignty: how the conflict between the UK government and the courts over prisoner voting rights was really about executive power. [Website]

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Publisher's URL: http://www.democraticaudit.com/2019/06/11/in-the-name-of-parliamentary-sovereignty-how-the-conflict-between-the-uk-government-and-the-courts-over-prisoner-voting-rights-was-really-about-executive-power/

Abstract

In UK political disputes over European Court of Human Rights judgments, such as the high-profile objections to rulings on prisoner voting, much political capital is made out of the claim that the European Court is impinging on UK parliamentary sovereignty. However, Helen Hardman argues that the objections have instead been based on concern that court rulings would limit the decision-making powers of the government, rather than the independence and sovereignty of parliament. Archival and interview data demonstrate that the strategic purpose of the stand-off against the European Court was directed at weakening the European Convention system because it empowers UK domestic courts to effectively challenge government policy.

Item Type:Website
Status:Published
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hardman, Dr Helen
Authors: Hardman, H.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Central and East European Studies

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