Hydro-meteorological risk assessment methods and management by nature-based solutions

Sahani, J., Kumar, P., Debele, S., Spyrou, C., Loupis, M., Aragão, L., Porcù, F., Shah, M. A. R. and Di Sabatino, S. (2019) Hydro-meteorological risk assessment methods and management by nature-based solutions. Science of the Total Environment, 696, 133936. (doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.133936)

[img]
Preview
Text
193395.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

898kB

Abstract

Hydro-meteorological risk (HMR) management involves a range of methods, such as monitoring of uncertain climate, planning and prevention by technical countermeasures, risk assessment, preparedness for risk by early-warnings, spreading knowledge and awareness, response and recovery. To execute HMR management by risk assessment, many models and tools, ranging from conceptual to sophisticated/numerical methods are currently in use. However, there is still a gap in systematically classifying and documenting them in the field of disaster risk management. This paper discusses various methods used for HMR assessment and its management via potential nature-based solutions (NBS), which are actually lessons learnt from nature. We focused on three hydro-meteorological hazards (HMHs), floods, droughts and heatwaves, and their management by relevant NBS. Different methodologies related to the chosen HMHs are considered with respect to exposure, vulnerability and adaptation interaction of the elements at risk. Two widely used methods for flood risk assessment are fuzzy logic (e.g. fuzzy analytic hierarchy process) and probabilistic methodology (e.g. univariate and multivariate probability distributions). Different kinds of indices have been described in the literature to define drought risk, depending upon the type of drought and the purpose of evaluation. For heatwave risk estimation, mapping of the vulnerable property and population-based on geographical information system is a widely used methodology in addition to a number of computational, mathematical and statistical methods, such as principal component analysis, extreme value theorem, functional data analysis, the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process and meta-analysis. NBS (blue, green and hybrid infrastructures) are promoted for HMR management. For example, marshes and wetlands in place of dams for flood and drought risk reduction, and green infrastructure for urban cooling and combating heatwaves, are potential NBS. More research is needed into risk assessment and management through NBS, to enhance its wider significance for sustainable living, building adaptations and resilience.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was supported by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme. It was funded by and carried out within the framework of OPERANDUM (OPEn-air laboRAtories for Nature baseD solUtions to Manage hydro-meteo risks) project (Grant no. 776848). Jeetendra Sahani and Prashant Kumar thank the University of Surrey for an ORS Award to support the PhD research of Jeetendra Sahani.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Shah, Dr Mohammad Aminur
Authors: Sahani, J., Kumar, P., Debele, S., Spyrou, C., Loupis, M., Aragão, L., Porcù, F., Shah, M. A. R., and Di Sabatino, S.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Interdisciplinary Studies
Journal Name:Science of the Total Environment
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0048-9697
ISSN (Online):1879-1026
Published Online:15 August 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 The Authors
First Published:First published in Science of the Total Environment 696:133936
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record