Evaluation of an inflammation-based prognostic score (GPS) in patients undergoing resection for colon and rectal cancer

McMillan, D. , Crozier, J.E.M., Canna, K., Angerson, W.J. and McArdle, C.S. (2007) Evaluation of an inflammation-based prognostic score (GPS) in patients undergoing resection for colon and rectal cancer. International Journal of Colorectal Disease, 22(8), pp. 881-886. (doi:10.1007/s00384-006-0259-6)

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Abstract

<p><b>Background/aims</b></p> <p>The aim of the study was to examine the value of the combination of an elevated C-reactive protein and hypoalbuminaemia (GPS) in predicting cancer-specific survival after resection for colon and rectal cancer.</p> <p><b>Materials and methods</b></p> <p>The GPS was constructed as follows: Patients with both an elevated C-reactive protein (>10 mg/l) and hypoalbuminaemia (<35 g/l) were allocated a score of 2. Patients in whom only one or none of these biochemical abnormalities was present were allocated a score of 1 or 0, respectively.</p> <p><b>Results</b></p> <p>A GPS of 1 (n = 109) was mainly due to an elevated C-reactive protein concentration and the remainder due to hypoalbuminaemia. In those patients with a GPS of 1 due to hypoalbuminaemia (n  = 16), the 3-year overall survival rate was 94% compared with 62% in those patients with a GPS of 1 due to an elevated C-reactive protein concentration (n = 93, p = 0.0094). Therefore, the GPS was modified such that patients with hypoalbuminaemia were assigned a score of 0 in the absence of an elevated C-reactive protein. On univariate analysis of those patients with colon and rectal cancer, the modified GPS (p< 0.0001) was significantly associated with overall and cancer specific survival. On univariate survival analysis of those patients with Dukes B colon and rectal cancer, the modified GPS (p< 0.01) was significantly associated with overall and cancer specific survival.</p> <p><b>Conclusion</b></p> <p>The results of the present study indicate that the GPS, before surgery, predicts overall and cancer-specific survival after resection of colon and rectal cancer.</p>

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Angerson, Dr Wilson and McMillan, Professor Donald
Authors: McMillan, D., Crozier, J.E.M., Canna, K., Angerson, W.J., and McArdle, C.S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Clinical Specialities
Journal Name:International Journal of Colorectal Disease
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0179-1958

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