Circadian disruption alters the effects of lipopolysaccharide treatment on circadian and ultradian locomotor activity and body temperature rhythms of female Siberian hamsters

Prendergast, B. J., Cable, E. J., Stevenson, T. J. , Onishi, K. G., Zucker, I. and Kay, L. M. (2015) Circadian disruption alters the effects of lipopolysaccharide treatment on circadian and ultradian locomotor activity and body temperature rhythms of female Siberian hamsters. Journal of Biological Rhythms, 30(6), pp. 543-556. (doi: 10.1177/0748730415609450) (PMID:26566981) (PMCID:PMC4900458)

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Abstract

The effect of circadian rhythm (CR) disruption on immune function depends on the method by which CRs are disrupted. Behavioral and thermoregulatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment were assessed in female Siberian hamsters in which circadian locomotor activity (LMA) rhythms were eliminated by exposure to a disruptive phase-shifting protocol (DPS) that sustains arrhythmicity even when hamsters are housed in a light-dark cycle. This noninvasive treatment avoids genome manipulations and neurological damage associated with other models of CR disruption. Circadian rhythmic (RHYTH) and arrhythmic (ARR) hamsters housed in a 16L:8D photocycle were injected with bacterial LPS near the onset of the light (zeitgeber time 1; ZT1) or dark (ZT16) phase. LPS injections at ZT16 and ZT1 elicited febrile responses in both RHYTH and ARR hamsters, but the effect was attenuated in the arrhythmic females. In ZT16, LPS inhibited LMA in the dark phase immediately after injection but not on subsequent nights in both chronotypes; in contrast, LPS at ZT1 elicited more enduring (~4 day) locomotor hypoactivity in ARR than in RHYTH hamsters. Power and period of dark-phase ultradian rhythms (URs) in LMA and Tb were markedly altered by LPS treatment, as was the power in the circadian waveform. Disrupted circadian rhythms in this model system attenuated responses to LPS in a trait- and ZT-specific manner; changes in UR period and power are novel components of the acute-phase response to infection that may affect energy conservation.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was supported by grant R01 AI-67406.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Stevenson, Dr Tyler
Authors: Prendergast, B. J., Cable, E. J., Stevenson, T. J., Onishi, K. G., Zucker, I., and Kay, L. M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Journal of Biological Rhythms
Publisher:SAGE
ISSN:0748-7304
ISSN (Online):1552-4531
Published Online:13 November 2015

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