Unusual, stable replicating viruses generated from mumps virus cDNA clones

Bamford, C., Wignall-Fleming, E., Sreenu, V. B. , Randall, R., Duprex, P. and Rima, B. (2019) Unusual, stable replicating viruses generated from mumps virus cDNA clones. PLoS ONE, 14(7), e0219168. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0219168) (PMID:31276568)

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Abstract

In reverse genetic experiments we have isolated recombinant mumps viruses (rMuV) that carry large numbers of mutations clustered in small parts of their genome, which are not caused by biased hyper-mutation. In two separate experiments we obtained such recombinant viruses: one virus had 11 mutations in the V/P region of the genome; the other, which also contained an extra transcription unit encoding green fluorescent protein (EGFP), had 32 mutations in the N gene. These specific sets of mutations have not been observed in naturally occurring MuV isolates. Unusually, the vast majority of the mutations (48/51) were synonymous. On passage in Vero cells and human B-LCL cells, a B lymphocyte-like cell line, these mutations appear stable as no reversion occurred to the original consensus sequence, although mutations in other parts of the genome occurred and changed in frequency during passage. Defective interfering RNAs accumulate in passage in Vero cells but not in B-LCL cells. Interestingly, in all passaged samples the level of variation in the EGFP gene is the same as in the viral genes, though it is unlikely that this gene is under any functionality constraint. What mechanism gave rise to these viruses with clustered mutations and their stability remains an open question, which is likely of interest to a wider field than mumps reverse genetics.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:The authors have acknowledged funding from a Wellcome Trust grant 101788/Z/13/Z to RER and funding from the respective universities for studentships, Queen’s University Belfast to CGB, and University of St Andrews to EWF.
Keywords:Research Article, Biology and life sciences, Medicine and health sciences, Research and analysis methods
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Wignall-fleming, Elizabeth and Bamford, Dr Connor and Randall, Professor Richard and Vattipally, Dr Sreenu
Authors: Bamford, C., Wignall-Fleming, E., Sreenu, V. B., Randall, R., Duprex, P., and Rima, B.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:PLoS ONE
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1932-6203
ISSN (Online):1932-6203
Published Online:05 July 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 Bamford et al.
First Published:First published in PLoS ONE 14(7):e0219168
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

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