Household socio-economic position and individual infectious disease risk in rural Kenya

De Glanville, W., Thomas, L.F., Cook, E.A.J., Bronsvoort, B.M. d. C., Wamae, N.C., Kariuki, S. and Fevre, E.M. (2019) Household socio-economic position and individual infectious disease risk in rural Kenya. Scientific Reports, 9, 2972. (doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-39375-z) (PMID:30814567) (PMCID:PMC6393457)

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Abstract

The importance of household socio-economic position (SEP) in shaping individual infectious disease risk is increasingly recognised, particularly in low income settings. However, few studies have measured the extent to which this association is consistent for the range of pathogens that are typically endemic among the rural poor in the tropics. This cross-sectional study assessed the relationship between SEP and human infection within a single community in western Kenya using a set of pathogens with diverse transmission routes. The relationships between household SEP and individual infection with Plasmodium falciparum, hookworm (Ancylostoma duodenale and/or Necator americanus), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and HIV, and co-infections between hookworm, P. falciparum and E. histolytica/dispar, were assessed using multivariable logistic and multinomial regression. Individuals in households with the lowest SEP were at greatest risk of infection with P. falciparum, hookworm and E. histolytica/dispar, as well as co-infection with each pathogen. Infection with M. tuberculosis, by contrast, was most likely in individuals living in households with the highest SEP. There was no evidence of a relationship between individual HIV infection and household SEP. We demonstrate the existence of a household socio-economic gradient within a rural farming community in Kenya which impacts upon individual infectious disease risk. Structural adjustments that seek to reduce poverty, and therefore the socio-economic inequalities that exist in this community, would be expected to substantially reduce overall infectious disease burden. However, policy makers and researchers should be aware that heterogeneous relationships can exist between household SEP and infection risk for different pathogens in low income settings.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:WAdeG and LFT were supported by BBSRC DTG awards, and EAJC by an MRC DTG award. EMF and the project described were supported by the Wellcome Trust (085308). Tis work received support from the CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH), led by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). We also acknowledge the CGIAR Fund Donors (http://www.cgiar.org/about-us/ our-funders/).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:De Glanville, Dr William
Authors: De Glanville, W., Thomas, L.F., Cook, E.A.J., Bronsvoort, B.M. d. C., Wamae, N.C., Kariuki, S., and Fevre, E.M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Scientific Reports
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2045-2322
ISSN (Online):2045-2322
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 The Authors
First Published:First published in Scientific Reports 9:2972
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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