Nursing teamwork in the care of older people: A mixed methods study

Anderson, J.E., Ross, A. J. , Lim, R., Kodate, N., Thompson, K., Jensen, H. and Cooney, K. (2019) Nursing teamwork in the care of older people: A mixed methods study. Applied Ergonomics, 80, pp. 119-129. (doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2019.05.012)

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Abstract

Healthcare is increasingly complex and requires the ability to adapt to changing demands. Teamwork is essential to delivering high quality care and is central to nursing. The aims of this study were to identify the processes that underpin nursing teamwork and how these affect the care of older people, identify the relationship between perceived teamwork and perceived quality of care, and explore in depth the experience of working in nursing teams. The study was carried out in three older people's wards in a London teaching hospital. Nurses and healthcare assistants completed questionnaires (n=65) on known dynamics of teamwork (using the Nursing Teamwork Survey) together with ratings of organisational quality (using an adapted AHRQ HSPS scale). A sample (n=22; 34%) was then interviewed about their perceptions of care, teamwork and how good outcomes are delivered in everyday work. Results showed that many care difficulties were routinely encountered, and confirmed the importance of teamwork (e.g. shared mental models of tasks and team roles and responsibilities, supported by leadership) in adapting to challenges. Perceived quality of teamwork was positively related to perceived quality of care. Work system variability and the external environment influenced teamwork, and confirmed the importance of team adaptive capacity. The CARE model shows the centrality of teamwork in adapting to variable demand and capacity to deliver care processes, and the influence of broader system factors on teamworking.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was supported by funding from Guy’s and St. Thomas’s NHS Foundation Trust.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Ross, Dr Alastair
Authors: Anderson, J.E., Ross, A. J., Lim, R., Kodate, N., Thompson, K., Jensen, H., and Cooney, K.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Dental School
Journal Name:Applied Ergonomics
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0003-6870
ISSN (Online):1872-9126
Published Online:28 May 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 Elsevier
First Published:First published in Applied Ergonomics 80:119-129
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
682561Centre of Excellence in Healthcare ResilienceAlastair RossGuy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust (GUYSTHOM)GFWTAARSM - DENTAL SCHOOL