Shoal familiarity modulates effects of individual metabolism on vulnerability to capture by trawling

Hollins, J.P.W., Thambithurai, D., Van Leeuwen, T.E., Allan, B., Koeck, B. , Bailey, D. and Killen, S.S. (2019) Shoal familiarity modulates effects of individual metabolism on vulnerability to capture by trawling. Conservation Physiology, 7(1), coz043. (doi: 10.1093/conphys/coz043) (PMID:31380110) (PMCID:PMC6661965)

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Abstract

Impacts of fisheries-induced evolution may extend beyond life history traits to more cryptic aspects of biology, such as behaviour and physiology. Understanding roles of physiological traits in determining individual susceptibility to capture in fishing gears and how these mechanisms change across contexts is essential to evaluate the capacity of commercial fisheries to elicit phenotypic change in exploited populations. Previous work has shown that metabolic traits related to anaerobic swimming may determine individual susceptibility to capture in trawls, with fish exhibiting higher anaerobic performance more likely to evade capture. However, high densities of fish aggregated ahead of a trawl net may exacerbate the role of social interactions in determining an individual fish’s behaviour and likelihood of capture, yet the role of social environment in modulating relationships between individual physiological traits and vulnerability to capture in trawls remains unknown. By replicating the final moments of capture in a trawl using shoals of wild minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus), we investigated the role of individual metabolic traits in determining susceptibility to capture among shoals of both familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics. We expected that increased shoal cohesion and conformity of behaviour in shoals of familiar fish would lessen the role of individual metabolic traits in determining susceptibility to capture. However, the opposite pattern was observed, with individual fish exhibiting high anaerobic capacity less vulnerable to capture in the trawl net, but only when tested alongside familiar conspecifics. This pattern is likely due to stronger cohesion within familiar shoals, where maintaining a minimal distance from conspecifics, and thus staying ahead of the net, becomes limited by individual anaerobic swim performance. In contrast, lower shoal cohesion and synchronicity of behaviours within unfamiliar shoals may exacerbate the role of stochastic processes in determining susceptibility to capture, disrupting relationships between individual metabolic traits and vulnerability to capture.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Koeck, Dr Barbara and Killen, Professor Shaun and Thambithurai, Davide and Allan, Ms Brooke and Bailey, Dr David and Van Leeuwen, Dr Travis and Hollins, Jack
Authors: Hollins, J.P.W., Thambithurai, D., Van Leeuwen, T.E., Allan, B., Koeck, B., Bailey, D., and Killen, S.S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Conservation Physiology
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:2051-1434
ISSN (Online):2051-1434
Published Online:26 July 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 The Authors
First Published:First published in Conservation Physiology 7(1):coz043
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
594261The Influence of Individual Physiology on Group Behaviour in Fish SchoolsShaun KillenNatural Environment Research Council (NERC)NE/J019100/1RI BIODIVERSITY ANIMAL HEALTH & COMPMED