The relative importance of perceived substance misuse use by different peers on smoking, alcohol and illicit drug use in adolescence

Er, V., Campbell, R., Hickman, M., Bonell, C., Moore, L. and White, J. (2019) The relative importance of perceived substance misuse use by different peers on smoking, alcohol and illicit drug use in adolescence. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 204, 107464. (doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.04.035) (PMID:31494443) (PMCID:31494443)

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Abstract

Background: Substance use by young people is strongly associated with that of their peers. Little is known about the influence of different types of peers. We tested the relationship between perceived substance use by five types of peers and adolescents’ use of illicit drugs, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Methods: We used data collected from 1285 students aged 12–13 as part of a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial (United Kingdom, 2014–2016). The exposures were the perceived use of illicit drugs, smoking and alcohol consumption by best friends, boy or girlfriends, brothers or sisters, friends outside of school and online. Outcomes were self-reported lifetime use of illicit drugs, smoking and alcohol consumption assessed 18-months later. Results: The lifetime prevalence of illicit drug use, smoking and alcohol consumption at the 18-month follow-up were 14.3%, 24.9% and 54.1%, respectively. In the fully adjusted models, perceived substance use by friends outside of school, brothers or sisters, and online had the most consistent associations with outcomes. Perceived use by friends online was associated with an increased risk of ever having used illicit drugs (odds ratio [OR] = 2.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.26, 4.69), smoking (OR = 1.61, 95% CI 0.96, 2.70) and alcohol consumption (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.71, 5.18). Conclusions: Perceived substance use by friends outside of school, brothers and sisters and online could be viable sources of peer influence. If these findings are replicated, a greater emphasis should be made in interventions to mitigate the influence of these peers.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Moore, Professor Laurence
Authors: Er, V., Campbell, R., Hickman, M., Bonell, C., Moore, L., and White, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
Journal Name:Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0376-8716
ISSN (Online):1879-0046
Published Online:30 August 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V.
First Published:First published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence 204:107464
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
727661SPHSU Core Renewal: Complexity in Health Improvement Research ProgrammeLaurence MooreMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/14IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
SPHSU14