Effects of dietary monounsaturated fatty acids on lipoprotein concentrations, compositions, and subfraction distributions and on VLDL apolipoprotein B kinetics: dose-dependent effects on LDL

Gill, J.M.R. , Brown, J.C., Caslake, M.J., Wright, D.M., Cooney, J., Bedford, D., Hughes, D.A., Stanley, J.C. and Packard, C.J. (2003) Effects of dietary monounsaturated fatty acids on lipoprotein concentrations, compositions, and subfraction distributions and on VLDL apolipoprotein B kinetics: dose-dependent effects on LDL. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 78(1), pp. 47-56.

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Publisher's URL: http://www.ajcn.org/content/78/1/47.short

Abstract

<p><b>Background</b>: Replacing dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs) with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) lowers LDL cholesterol, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear.</p> <p><b>Objective</b>: We assessed the effects of replacing dietary SFAs with MUFAs on concentrations and subclass distributions of VLDL, intermediate-density lipoprotein, LDL, and HDL and on VLDL apolipoprotein B kinetics.</p> <p><b>Design</b>: Thirty-five moderately hypercholesterolemic, middle-aged volunteers consumed for 6 wk, in random order, diets containing low (L-MUFA; 7.8% of energy from MUFAs), moderate (M-MUFA; 10.3% from MUFAs), or high (H-MUFA; 13.7% from MUFAs) amounts of MUFAs. Fasting blood samples were taken from all subjects after each intervention. VLDL apolipoprotein B kinetic studies were performed in a subgroup after the L-MUFA and H-MUFA diets.</p> <p><b>Results</b>: Plasma cholesterol concentrations decreased in a dose-dependent manner with increasing intakes of dietary MUFAs. This change was entirely accounted for by reduced LDL cholesterol (-0.20 and -0.49 mmol/L after the M-MUFA and H-MUFA diets, respectively, compared with the concentration after the L-MUFA diet; P for trend < 0.01). Plasma triacylglycerol and HDL cholesterol were not significantly affected by the dietary intervention, nor were the concentrations of VLDL1 (Sf 60–400), VLDL2 (Sf 20–60), or intermediate-density lipoprotein (Sf 12–20). Production and catabolic rates for VLDL1 and VLDL2 were also unaffected. HDL and LDL subclass distributions were not significantly altered, but as a consequence of the overall LDL lowering, concentrations of atherogenic LDL-III were 25% lower after the H-MUFA diet than after the L-MUFA diet (P = 0.02).</p> <p><b>Conclusion</b>: The effects of replacing dietary SFAs with MUFAs on lipoprotein metabolism appear to be almost exclusively limited to the LDL density class.</p>

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gill, Professor Jason and Bedford, Mrs Dorothy and Cooney, Mrs Josephine and Hughes, Dr David and Packard, Professor Chris
Authors: Gill, J.M.R., Brown, J.C., Caslake, M.J., Wright, D.M., Cooney, J., Bedford, D., Hughes, D.A., Stanley, J.C., and Packard, C.J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
ISSN:0002-9165

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record