Incidence of type 2 diabetes in people with a history of hospitalization for major mental illness in Scotland, 2001-2015: a retrospective cohort study

Jackson, C. A., Fleetwood, K., Kerssens, J., Smith, D. J. , Mercer, S. and Wild, S. H. (2019) Incidence of type 2 diabetes in people with a history of hospitalization for major mental illness in Scotland, 2001-2015: a retrospective cohort study. Diabetes Care, 42(10), pp. 1879-1885. (doi:10.2337/dc18-2152) (PMID:31471379)

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Abstract

Objective: To determine the incidence of type 2 diabetes in people with a history of hospitalization for major mental illness versus no mental illness in Scotland by time period and sociodemographics. Research Design and Methods: We used national Scottish population-based records to create cohorts with a hospital record of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or depression or no mental illness and to ascertain diabetes incidence. We used quasi-Poisson regression models including age, sex, time period, and area-based deprivation to estimate incidence and relative risks (RRs) of diabetes by mental illness status. Estimates are illustrated for people aged 60 years and in the middle deprivation quintile in 2015. Results: We identified 254,136 diabetes cases during 2001–2015. Diabetes incidence in 2015 was 1.5- to 2.5-fold higher in people with versus without a major mental disorder, with the gap having slightly increased over time. RRs of diabetes incidence were greater among women than men for schizophrenia (RR 2.40 [95% CI 2.01, 2.85] and 1.63 [1.38, 1.94]), respectively) and depression (RR 2.10 [1.86, 2.36] and 1.62 [1.43, 1.82]) but similar for bipolar disorder (RR 1.65 [1.35, 2.02] and 1.50 [1.22, 1.84]). Absolute and relative differences in diabetes incidence associated with mental illness increased with increasing deprivation. Conclusions: Disparities in diabetes incidence between people with and without major mental illness appear to be widening. Major mental illness has a greater effect on diabetes risk in women and people living in more deprived areas, which has implications for intervention strategies to reduce diabetes risk in this vulnerable population.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Mercer, Professor Stewart and Smith, Professor Daniel
Authors: Jackson, C. A., Fleetwood, K., Kerssens, J., Smith, D. J., Mercer, S., and Wild, S. H.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Diabetes Care
Publisher:American Diabetes Association
ISSN:0149-5992
ISSN (Online):1935-5548
Published Online:30 August 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 American Diabetes Association
First Published:First published in Diabetes Care 42(10):1879-1885
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
3029570Mental Health Data PathfinderDaniel SmithMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_PC_17217HW - Mental Health and Wellbeing

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