Effect of crop residue addition on soil organic carbon priming as influenced by temperature and soil properties

Lenka, S., Trivedi, P., Singh, B., Singh, B. P., Pendall, E., Bass, A. and Lenka, N. K. (2019) Effect of crop residue addition on soil organic carbon priming as influenced by temperature and soil properties. Geoderma, 347, pp. 70-79. (doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2019.03.039)

Lenka, S., Trivedi, P., Singh, B., Singh, B. P., Pendall, E., Bass, A. and Lenka, N. K. (2019) Effect of crop residue addition on soil organic carbon priming as influenced by temperature and soil properties. Geoderma, 347, pp. 70-79. (doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2019.03.039)

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Abstract

Priming of soil organic carbon (SOC) is a crucial factor in ecosystem carbon balance. Despite its increasing importance in the changing global climate, the extent of influence of temperature and soil properties on the priming effect remains unclear. Here, soil priming was investigated using 13C labeled wheat residues in two cultivated, subtropical (Vertisol) and semi-arid (Luvisol), soils of Australia at four incubation temperatures (13, 23, 33 and 43 °C). The priming effect was computed from respired CO2 and associated δ13C, which were measured periodically over the 52-day incubation period. Wheat residue addition resulted in greater priming effect in the Luvisol (1.17 to 2.37% of SOC) than the Vertisol (0.02 to 1.56% of SOC). The priming of SOC was the highest at 23 °C in the Luvisol, and at 43 °C in the Vertsiol, which indicates a variable positive priming effect of temperature in different soil types. Wheat residue addition significantly increased the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of SOC mineralization in the Vertisol at temperature ranges below 33 °C (i.e., 13–23 and 23–33 °C) and had no significant effect in the Luvisol. A negative correlation was observed between temperature and the Q10 values. Across soils, the Q10 of residue C was lower than SOC suggesting that soil C is more vulnerable to climatic warming. This work demonstrates that the magnitude of SOC priming by wheat residue and Q10 of SOC mineralization varied significantly with soil type (Luvsiol > Vertisol) and incubation conditions (temperature and time). Given the current trend towards increasing atmospheric temperatures, future studies should evaluate temperature effects on the priming of different pools of SOC induced by crop residue in different agro-ecosystems.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:The senior author acknowledges with gratitude the research funding provided by the Australian government through its Endeavour Research Fellowship. She also acknowledges support from the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment at the Western Sydney University to offer the honorary academic appointment.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Bass, Dr Adrian
Authors: Lenka, S., Trivedi, P., Singh, B., Singh, B. P., Pendall, E., Bass, A., and Lenka, N. K.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Geographical and Earth Sciences
Journal Name:Geoderma
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0016-7061
ISSN (Online):1872-6259
Published Online:02 April 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V.
First Published:First published in Geoderma 347:70-79
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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