How does surgery compare to sham surgery or physiotherapy as a treatment for tendinopathy? A systematic review of randomised trials

Millar, N. L. (2019) How does surgery compare to sham surgery or physiotherapy as a treatment for tendinopathy? A systematic review of randomised trials. BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine, 5(1), e000528. (doi:10.1136/bmjsem-2019-000528) (PMID:31191975) (PMCID:PMC6539146)

Millar, N. L. (2019) How does surgery compare to sham surgery or physiotherapy as a treatment for tendinopathy? A systematic review of randomised trials. BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine, 5(1), e000528. (doi:10.1136/bmjsem-2019-000528) (PMID:31191975) (PMCID:PMC6539146)

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Abstract

Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of surgery on all tendinopathies by comparing it to no treatment, sham surgery and exercise-based therapies for both mid-term (12 months) and long-term (> 12 months) outcomes. Methods: Our literature search included EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL and Scopus. A combined assessment of internal validity, external validity and precision of each eligible study yielded its overall study quality. Results were considered significant if they were based on strong (Level 1) or moderate (Level 2) evidence. Results: 12 studies were eligible. Participants had the following types of tendinopathy: shoulder in seven studies, lateral elbow in three, patellar in one and Achilles in one. Two studies were of good, four of moderate and six of poor overall quality. Surgery was superior to no treatment or placebo, for the outcomes of pain, function, range of movement (ROM) and treatment success in the short and midterm. Surgery had similar effects to sham surgery on pain, function and range of motion in the midterm. Physiotherapy was as effective as surgery both in the midterm and long term for pain, function, ROM and tendon force, and pain, treatment success and quality of life, respectively. Conclusion: We recommend that healthcare professionals who treat tendinopathy encourage patients to comply with loading exercise treatment for at least 12 months before the option of surgery is seriously entertained.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Millar, Dr Neal
Authors: Millar, N. L.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:2055-7647
ISSN (Online):2055-7647
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 The Authors
First Published:First published in BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine 5(1):e000528
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
632345MRC Doctoral Training Grant 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16George BaillieMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/K501335/1MVLS GRADUATE SCHOOL
725711HMGB1: a key damage mediator in tendinopathyNeal MillarArthritis Research UK (ARTRESUK)21346III -IMMUNOLOGY