Exploring the acceptability and feasibility of using activity monitors to support increased physical activity within an exercise referral scheme for adults with, or at risk of, a chronic health condition

Hawkins, J. et al. (2018) Exploring the acceptability and feasibility of using activity monitors to support increased physical activity within an exercise referral scheme for adults with, or at risk of, a chronic health condition. Journal of Physical Activity and Health 15(10)Suppl.1:S245. Meeting abstract: 7th International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress, London, UK, 15-17 Oct 2018. (doi:10.1123/jpah.2018-0535)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Introduction: Whilst there is evidence for initial effectiveness of exercise referral schemes for increasing physical activity, evidence of long-term effects is limited. In Wales, a trial of the National Exercise Referral Scheme [NERS] showed small but significant impacts on physical activity at 12-month follow-up. Technologies such as activity monitors may enhance long-term maintenance of activity by facilitating goal setting and progress monitoring and supporting intrinsic motivation. This pilot trial explored the acceptability and feasibility of implementing accelerometry-based activity monitors within NERS. Methods: New NERS participants (mean age = 57, 65% female) were randomised to receive either an activity monitor alongside NERS (n = 88) or usual practice (n = 68). Participants completed questionnaires at baseline, 16-weeks and 52-weeks. Twenty intervention participants and 12 NERS staff completed interviews at 4-weeks and 52-weeks. Results: Findings suggest that participant experiences of utilising the activity monitors were mixed. Approximately half of participants reported that the devices were easy to use (49%) and met their expectations (57%). In interviews, some participants reported that the monitors helped them to become more aware of their physical activity levels and increased their motivation. Barriers to acceptability included general and device-specific wearability and technological problems, such as device malfunctioning and computer compatibility issues. Staff also reported device- and contextspecific technological barriers to implementing the monitors alongside usual practice. Conclusion: Whilst some findings were device-specific, there are broader lessons for future research and practice incorporating activity monitoring devices into physical activity interventions such as implications for delivery staff time and training.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item
Additional Information:Funding: Health and Care Research Wales.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Simpson, Professor Sharon
Authors: Hawkins, J., Edwards, M., McConnon, L., Hallingberg, B., Kelson, M., Oliver, E., Charles, J., Tudor Edwards, R., Murphy, S., Simpson, S., Jago, R., Morgan, K., and Moore, G.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Journal of Physical Activity and Health
ISSN:1543-3080

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
727661SPHSU Core Renewal: Complexity in Health Improvement Research ProgrammeLaurence MooreMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/14IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
620221MRC SPHSU/GU Transfer FellowshipsLaurence MooreMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_PC_13027IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
SPHSU_14