Evolution of sexually-transferred steroids and mating-induced phenotypes in Anopheles mosquitoes

Pondeville, E., Puchot, N., Lang, M., Cherrier, F., Schaffner, F., Dauphin-Villemant, C., Bischoff, E. and Bourgouin, C. (2019) Evolution of sexually-transferred steroids and mating-induced phenotypes in Anopheles mosquitoes. Scientific Reports, 9, 4669. (doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-41094-4) (PMID:30874601) (PMCID:PMC6420574)

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Abstract

Human malaria, which remains a major public health problem, is transmitted by a subset of Anopheles mosquitoes belonging to only three out of eight subgenera: Anopheles, Cellia and Nyssorhynchus. Unlike almost every other insect species, males of some Anopheles species produce steroid hormones which are transferred to females during copulation to influence their reproduction. Steroids are consequently a potential target for malaria vector control. Here, we analysed the evolution of sexually-transferred steroids and their effects on female reproductive traits across Anopheles by using a set of 16 mosquito species (five Anopheles, eight Cellia, and three Nyssorhynchus), including malaria vector and non-vector species. We show that male steroid production and transfer are specific to the Cellia and therefore represent a synapomorphy of this subgenus. Furthermore, we show that mating-induced effects in females are variable across species and differences are not correlated with sexually-transferred steroids or with Anopheles ability to transmit human malaria. Overall, our findings highlight that Anopheles mosquitoes have evolved different reproductive strategies, independently of being a malaria vector or not.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Support to E.P. was from an ANR-07-MIME-O25-01 award to C.B. and by the UK Medical Research Council to E.P. (MC_UU_12014/8), to C.B. from award no. ANR-10-LABX-62-IBEID. M.L. was hosted by V. Courtier-Orgogozo, financed by a FRM postdoctoral fellowship SPF20121226328 and by the CNRS.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Pondeville, Dr Emilie
Authors: Pondeville, E., Puchot, N., Lang, M., Cherrier, F., Schaffner, F., Dauphin-Villemant, C., Bischoff, E., and Bourgouin, C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Scientific Reports
Publisher:Nature Research
ISSN:2045-2322
ISSN (Online):2045-2322
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 The Authors
First Published:First published in Scientific Reports 9: 4669
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
656551Arbovirus interactions with arthropod hostsAlain KohlMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12014/8MVLS III - CENTRE FOR VIRUS RESEARCH