Transmission ecology of canine parvovirus in a multi-host, multi-pathogen system

Behdenna, A. et al. (2019) Transmission ecology of canine parvovirus in a multi-host, multi-pathogen system. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences, (Accepted for Publication)

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Abstract

Understanding multi-host pathogen maintenance and transmission dynamics is critical for disease control. However, transmission dynamics remain enigmatic largely because they are difficult to observe directly, particularly in wildlife. Here, we investigate the transmission dynamics of canine parvovirus (CPV) using state-space modelling of 20-years of CPV serology data from domestic dogs and African lions in the Serengeti ecosystem. We show that, although vaccination reduces the probability of infection in dogs, and despite indirect enhancement of population seropositivity as a result of vaccine shedding, the vaccination coverage achieved has been insufficient to prevent CPV from becoming widespread. CPV is maintained by the dog population and has become endemic with ~3.5-year cycles and prevalence reaching ~80%. While the estimated prevalence in lions is lower, peaks of infection consistently follow those in dogs. Dogs exposed to CPV are also more likely to become infected with a second multihost pathogen, canine distemper virus. However, vaccination can weaken this coupling raising questions about the value of monovalent versus polyvalent vaccines against these two pathogens. Our findings highlight the need to consider both pathogen- and host-level community interactions when seeking to understand the dynamics of multi-host pathogens and their implications for conservation, disease surveillance and control programmes.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Accepted for Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Czupryna, Dr Anna and Lankester, Dr Felix and Halliday, Dr Joanna and Haydon, Professor Daniel and Behdenna, Mr Abdelkader and Willett, Professor Brian and Hopcraft, Dr Grant and Lembo, Dr Tiziana and Viana, Dr Mafalda and Cleaveland, Professor Sarah and Sutton, Dr David and Hampson, Dr Katie and Craft, Dr Meggan
Authors: Behdenna, A., Lembo, T., Calatayud, O., Cleaveland, S., Halliday, J. E.B., Packer, C., Lankester, F., Hampson, K., Craft, M. E., Czupryna, A., Dobson, A. P., Dubovi, E. J., Eblate, E., Fyumagwa, R., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Mentzel, C., Mzimbiri, I., Sutton, D., Willett, B., Haydon, D. T., and Viana, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Name:Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences
Publisher:The Royal Society
ISSN:0962-8452
ISSN (Online):1471-2954
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 The Authors
First Published:First published in Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences 2019
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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