The longitudinal course of fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Norfolk Arthritis Register

Druce, K. L., Jones, G. T., Macfarlane, G. J., Verstappen, S. M.M. and Basu, N. (2015) The longitudinal course of fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Norfolk Arthritis Register. Journal of Rheumatology, 42(11), pp. 2059-2065. (doi: 10.3899/jrheum.141498) (PMID:26472420)

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Abstract

Objective. Fatigue is common and burdensome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Despite RA fatigue progression varying significantly between individuals in practice, existing longitudinal analyses only examine symptom advancement on a population level. This study aimed to determine fatigue trajectories at an individual level and to characterize those patients with the poorest prognosis, with a view to enabling earlier interventions. Methods. Patients with RA reporting clinically relevant baseline fatigue (≥ 20 mm on a 0–100 mm visual analog scale) were identified from a longterm inflammatory polyarthritis cohort (the Norfolk Arthritis Register). Fatigue changes from baseline to 1- and 4-year followups were calculated, and sex-stratified group-based trajectory modeling (GBTM) determined trajectories of the symptom between which baseline characteristics were compared. Results. Among 338 patients, only minimal average changes were observed between recruitment to 1 year (6.0 mm, SD 26.9) and 4 years (5.5 mm, SD 29.3). This was despite 45.6% and 40.7% of participants reporting clinically significant improvements (≥ 10 mm) at these respective followups. GBTM revealed varied trajectories of fatigue, which for both sexes consisted of Improved (men, n = 48 and women, n = 81) or persistent Moderate-high paths (n = 54, n = 105), and further included a persistent High trajectory in women (n = 50). Participants who followed persistent trajectories were best distinguished from improvers by patient-reported rather than demographic or clinical variables. Conclusion. Among patients with RA presenting with clinically relevant fatigue, distinct longitudinal symptom trajectories were identified on an individual level despite nominal average changes in fatigue on a group level. It is possible to identify and characterize subgroups of participants who report persistent fatigue and should therefore be targeted to receive future fatigue-alleviating interventions.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Basu, Professor Neil
Authors: Druce, K. L., Jones, G. T., Macfarlane, G. J., Verstappen, S. M.M., and Basu, N.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Journal of Rheumatology
Publisher:Journal of Rheumatology
ISSN:0315-162X
ISSN (Online):1499-2752

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