Carboxymethyl cellulose coated magnetic nanoparticles transport across a human lung microvascular endothelial cell model of the blood–brain barrier

Aguilera, G., Berry, C. C. , West, R. M., Gonzalez-Monterrubio, E., Angulo-Molina, A., Arias-Carrión, Ó. and Méndez-Rojas, M. Á. (2019) Carboxymethyl cellulose coated magnetic nanoparticles transport across a human lung microvascular endothelial cell model of the blood–brain barrier. Nanoscale Advances, 1(2), pp. 671-685. (doi:10.1039/c8na00010g)

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Abstract

Sustained and safe delivery of therapeutic agents across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major challenges for the treatment of neurological disorders as this barrier limits the ability of most drug molecules to reach the brain. Targeted delivery of the drugs used to treat these disorders could potentially offer a considerable reduction of the common side effects of their treatment. The preparation and characterization of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@CMC) is reported as an alternative that meets the need for novel therapies capable of crossing the BBB. In vitro assays were used to evaluate the ability of these polysaccharide coated biocompatible, water-soluble, magnetic nanoparticles to deliver drug therapy across a model of the BBB. As a drug model, dopamine hydrochloride loading and release profiles in physiological solution were determined using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Cell viability tests in Human Lung Microvascular Endothelial (HLMVE) cell cultures showed no significant cell death, morphological changes or alterations in mitochondrial function after 24 and 48 h of exposure to the nanoparticles. Evidence of nanoparticle interactions and nanoparticle uptake by the cell membrane was obtained by electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) analyses. Permeability through a BBB model (the transwell assay) was evaluated to assess the ability of Fe3O4@CMC nanoparticles to be transported across a densely packed HLMVE cell barrier. The results suggest that these nanoparticles can be useful drug transport and release systems for the design of novel pharmaceutical agents for brain therapy.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was supported by CONACYT (Grants # CB-2010/154602, CONACYT-BMBF 2013/208132 and INFR-2014/02-23053). Partial support from the Office of Graduate Studies and Research (UDLAP) and Hospital General Dr Manuel Gea González is acknowledged.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Berry, Dr Catherine
Authors: Aguilera, G., Berry, C. C., West, R. M., Gonzalez-Monterrubio, E., Angulo-Molina, A., Arias-Carrión, Ó., and Méndez-Rojas, M. Á.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
Journal Name:Nanoscale Advances
Publisher:Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN:2516-0230
ISSN (Online):2516-0230
Published Online:16 October 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 The Authors
First Published:First published in Nanoscale Advances 1(2):671-685
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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